A toppled ficus tree in Coral Gables after Hurricane Irma. Ficus trees are vulnerable with their shallow roots and heavy crowns.
A toppled ficus tree in Coral Gables after Hurricane Irma. Ficus trees are vulnerable with their shallow roots and heavy crowns. Linda Robertson lrobertson@miamiherald.com
A toppled ficus tree in Coral Gables after Hurricane Irma. Ficus trees are vulnerable with their shallow roots and heavy crowns. Linda Robertson lrobertson@miamiherald.com

We lost our trees. We lost our power. Now, who can we blame for not trimming the trees?

September 21, 2017 08:31 PM

UPDATED September 21, 2017 08:55 PM

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  • Special tank allows scientists to churn up category 5 hurricane force storms

    Model beach houses take a beating as scientists at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science crank up a one-of-a-kind hurricane simulation tank at the school. Scientist Ben Kirtman, the Director of the Cooperative Institute of Marine & Atmospheric Studies explains how creating Cat 5 force winds and waves in the giant tank help with making predications and future forecasts that help save lives.