Vector biologist Katherine Ramirez with the Consolidated Mosquito Abatement District in Fresno County, California releases non-biting sterile male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes infected with Wolbachia in June 2016. Miami-Dade officials are considering using the same method to help reduce the numbers of mosquitoes that spread Zika.
Vector biologist Katherine Ramirez with the Consolidated Mosquito Abatement District in Fresno County, California releases non-biting sterile male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes infected with Wolbachia in June 2016. Miami-Dade officials are considering using the same method to help reduce the numbers of mosquitoes that spread Zika. ERIC PAUL ZAMORA ezamora@fresnobee.com
Vector biologist Katherine Ramirez with the Consolidated Mosquito Abatement District in Fresno County, California releases non-biting sterile male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes infected with Wolbachia in June 2016. Miami-Dade officials are considering using the same method to help reduce the numbers of mosquitoes that spread Zika. ERIC PAUL ZAMORA ezamora@fresnobee.com

Miami-Dade considers new weapon in Zika fight: disease-fighting bacteria

November 11, 2016 6:54 PM