Haiti

How to help Haiti after Hurricane Matthew

AP

After Hurricane Matthew made landfall in Haiti Tuesday, organizations are collecting supplies and financial donations.

READ MORE: As Hurricane Matthew hits Haiti, residents have nowhere to go

Agencies collecting donations and supplies include:

▪ Notre Dame D'Haiti Catholic Church, 110 NE 62nd Street is collecting as a donation site.

▪ L'Union Suite, a website run by Haitian Americans promoting Haitian-American business and culture, suggests dropping off water, medical supplies, baby supplies and warm clothing to CMS International Group, 333 NW 168th St. in Miami Gardens.

▪ Miami Gardens is accepting donations at the police department, 18611 NW 27th Ave. https://twitter.com/MGPDFL/status/784844990811824128

And here are the Miami fire rescue sites:

Station 1, 144 NE Fifth St.

Station 2, 1901 North Miami Ave.

Station 3, 1103 NW Seventh St.

Station 4, 1105 SW Second Ave.

Station 5, 1200 NW 20th St.

Station 6, 701 NW 36th St.

Station 7, 314 Beacom Blvd.

Station 8, 2975 Oak Ave.

Station 9, 69 NE 62nd St.

Station 10, 4101 NW 7th St.

Station 11, 5920 West Flager St.

Station 12, 1455 NW 46th St. 

Station 13, 990 NE 79th St.

Station 14, 2111 SW 19th St.

They accepting goods until Oct. 15 from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. They are not accepting liquid, clothing or money. https://twitter.com/CityofMiami/status/784848129287942144

▪ Catholic Relief Services is collecting blankets, kitchen, hygiene kits, other supplies and financial donations on its website.

▪ Gaskov Clerge Foundatoon, gaskov.org

▪ Fondation Aquin  Solidarite, gofundme.com/aquinhaiti

▪ The Three Little Flowers Center, 3littleflowerscenter.org

▪ Paradis des Indiens, friendsofpdi.org

▪Project Saint Anne, projectsanne.org

▪ Fonkoze, fonkoze.org

▪ The Lanbi Fund of Haiti, lambifund.org

▪ Flying High for Haiti, flyinghighforhaiti.org

▪ Saint Boniface Fountation, haitihealth.org

▪ Prodev, prodebhaiti.org

▪  The city of North Miami is accepting donations at the North Miami police department headquarters, 700 NE 124th St., the Joe Celestin Center, 1525 NW 135th St. and at the Griffing Community Center, 12220 Griffing Blvd. They will take donations from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and they are primarily seeking dry, non-perishable food, first aid supplies, blankets and infant care items. They are also asking for water filters, tarps and hygiene kits.

▪ Archdiocese of Miami’s Catholic Charities established a relief fund for people in the Caribbean affected by the hurricane. Financial donations will be designated to provide transportation, gas, food and rebuilding or repairs. Those contributions can be made at the Catholic Charities website. On the donate tab, select the box “Disaster Relief — Hurricane Matthew.”

▪ United Way and Miami Herald/El Nuevo Herald have already activated Operation Helping Hands to raise money for people affected by the storm. All of the money raised through Operation Helping Hands will go directly to help people affected by Hurricane Matthew.

▪  The Greater Miami Jewish Federation has a Hurricane Matthew Relief Fund with 100 percent of the proceeds going to assist Haiti and other communities devastated by the hurricane. Donations can be made at its website.

▪ Food for the Poor in Coconut Creek, which is sending nine 40-foot containers from its Haitian warehouse to Jeremie, which took the full force of the storm, is collecting donations for Haiti relief. Call 1-800-427-9104 or visit www.FoodForThePoor.org/hurricane

▪ Food Aid International is sending meals to Haiti. Donations can be made at its website.

▪ Guidelines for giving can be found at the Center for International Disaster Information website.

▪  International Medical Corps is currently in Haiti. Financial donations can be made at its website.

▪  All Hands Volunteers are heading to Haiti to help with rebuilding. Donations can be made at its website.

▪  CARE is providing clean drinking water, food and emergencies supplies such as tarps, blankets and hygiene kits. Donations can be made at its website.

President Barack Obama met with FEMA Wednesday about Hurricane Matthew and encouraged people to help those in Haiti “who didn’t have a lot to begin with and are now getting hammered by this storm.”

The Cooperative for American Remittances to Europe, or CARE, director in Haiti, Jean-Michel Vigreux, said the southern part of Haiti was hit hard and is cut off from the rest of the country.

Photo Gallery: Hurricane Matthew hits Haiti

“The impacts of Matthew there are hard to evaluate as communication is very difficult, but we know of floods, landslides and continuous heavy rains in some areas of the south,” he said. “We also heard of destroyed houses, streets and bridges, dead livestock, destroyed livelihoods.”

The government estimates damages at about $1 billion.

Trees were uprooted and electric lines were cut off due to strong winds in the capital of Port-au-Prince. CARE distributed blankets and buckets at 11 a.m. before the storm hit Tuesday, the director said.

Haiti is still recovering from long-term effects of the earthquake in 2010, , the cholera outbreak two years later, two cyclones, a tropical storm and two droughts, Vigreux said.

“The population is very strained,” he said. “Strengthening people’s resilience and boosting the reconstruction are key.”

Miami Herald staff writers Jacqueline Charles and Patricia Mazzei contributed to this report.

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