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Father pulled son from burning car during race, video shows. That broke NASCAR rules

Father pulls son from burning car after race crash

Dean Jones was watching his son Mike compete in the Halifax Insurance 100 race on June 16, 2018 at a Virginia speedway when Mike’s car hit off a competitor while making a turn, spinning the vehicle out of control, crashing and catching fire.
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Dean Jones was watching his son Mike compete in the Halifax Insurance 100 race on June 16, 2018 at a Virginia speedway when Mike’s car hit off a competitor while making a turn, spinning the vehicle out of control, crashing and catching fire.

Dean Jones said “nothing else mattered” when his son’s car spun out of control and burst into flames on a Virginia raceway, TODAY reported.

Video shows two cars collide as they’re turning on the track during a NASCAR-sanctioned race at South Boston Speedway last weekend. The neon, white and black-colored vehicle appeared to bear the brunt of the collision, and caught fire after coming to a stop. Jones’ son, Mike Jones, was behind the wheel, according to TODAY.

Dean Jones can be seen running from the pit to the car, helping to get Mike out of the car as quick as possible. Others work to extinguish the blaze as Mike Jones walks away from the scene. Dean Jones is Mike’s crew chief, TODAY reported.

Mike told WDBJ7 that he wasn’t surprised to see his father after the crash.

"If I had to place a bet on who would've pulled me out, I would've bet it was him," he said.

The crowd applauded when Dean Jones ran out onto the track, the news station reported. But South Boston Speedway didn’t exactly applaud his protective instincts, reported ESPN.

Dean Jones was put on probation for violating a NASCAR rule that prohibits “non-safety personnel” from entering the track during an event.

"Mr. Jones will not be fined nor suspended," South Boston Speedway told ESPN in a statement. "He has been placed on probation through the end of the year.

The disciplinary action means Jones can’t break anymore NASCAR rules, according to WDBJ7.

Jones isn’t the first to get in trouble for jumping the pit to tend to a crash. Several NASCAR crew members were reprimanded in 2015 when they helped turn over a wrecked car after a crash, ESPN reported. The rules are aimed to ensure emergency vehicles have a clear path to get to the scene, the publication said.

Jones and his son are concerned with what the damaged vehicle means for future races.

“It certainly hurt… it was definitely a big financial hit,” Mike Jones told TODAY. “(We’re) just trying to get a feel for what it would take if and when we would be able to race again,” he said.

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