Miami-Dade County

Call it whatever, but there’s too much of it in the water so there’s more swim advisories

Why do they close beaches in Florida?

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection frequently monitors water quality, and routinely collects algal bloom samples. When toxicity levels present a risk to human health, the state will issue advisories and may also post warning signs.
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The Florida Department of Environmental Protection frequently monitors water quality, and routinely collects algal bloom samples. When toxicity levels present a risk to human health, the state will issue advisories and may also post warning signs.

There are only so many words for feces and we’ve waded through the list so often we ought to carry our own health department warning.

Alas, we need to tell you once again that there is a new swimming advisory posted at Virginia Key Beach due to bacteria in the water often found in the intestinal tract of humans and animals that can make you sick.

You have to be quick if you want to take a dip here and get in the water between advisories. That beach was just cleared on Friday after testing clean for a couple of days but is back on the list as of Wednesday, according to the Florida Department of Health.

The swimming advisories issued on Sept. 5 at Crandon North and Crandon South remain in effect because water samples collected there, and at Virginia Key, did not meet the recreational water quality standard for enterococci — in other words: too much doo-doo in the water. (Sorry. We’ve overused ‘poop.’ And you know we can’t use the other word you’re thinking of.)

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Miami Herald Real Time/Breaking News reporter Howard Cohen, a 2017 Media Excellence Awards winner, has covered pop music, theater, health and fitness, obituaries, municipal government and general assignment. He started his career in the Features department at the Miami Herald in 1991.
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