South Florida

There are better days ahead for the weather. But we need to get through this first

Hottest day records happen twice as often as coldest day ones in U.S.

Americans have been twice as likely to experience record-breaking heat than record-setting cold, Associated Press data analysis shows. It counted the times daily hot temperature records were tied or broken compared to daily cold records.
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Americans have been twice as likely to experience record-breaking heat than record-setting cold, Associated Press data analysis shows. It counted the times daily hot temperature records were tied or broken compared to daily cold records.

It won’t be pretty.

Gray skies. Sheets of rain. Possible flooding. A riptide risk.

That’s what South Florida is looking like on Tuesday.

If you woke up early, your neighborhood might already be seeing some rain. And the Keys got hammered early.

But the worst of the weather is expected Tuesday afternoon, stretching into Wednesday.

The National Weather Service pegs the rain chance at 70 percent during the day and 80 percent at night. That pretty much says it all.

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It’s all thanks to the conversion of several systems: from the south, to the north, to the west over the Gulf of Mexico.

It all adds up to a miserable stretch.

“The east coast appears to be the bull’s-eye,” said Lissette Gonzalez, meteorologist at Miami Herald news partner CBS4.

Forecasters expect one to three inches of rain and wind gusts.

The ocean poses risks for swimmers and small boats as well.

“It’s not a good day for boating,” Gonzalez said.

The rainy weather will keep high afternoon temperatures in the low 70s, dropping to the mid-60s overnight and into Wednesday morning.

But consider this gloom the payment due for brighter days ahead.

Forecasters say the sun will begin to return Thursday, and it will turn cooler as well.

And, then Friday and Saturday. Glorious. Just glorious.

The forecast for those days: clear, sunny skies, with highs in the mid-70s and lows dropping to the — wait for it — 50s.

But first, said Gonzalez, “We have to get through today and tomorrow.”

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