Food & Drink

78,000 pounds of turkey made by Butterball recalled after link to salmonella outbreak

What is salmonella and how do you keep from getting it?

Salmonella causes about 1.2 million illnesses and 450 deaths in the U.S. every year, according to the CDC. The bacteria is typically transmitted through contaminated food, but some simple preventative measures can keep you from getting sick.
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Salmonella causes about 1.2 million illnesses and 450 deaths in the U.S. every year, according to the CDC. The bacteria is typically transmitted through contaminated food, but some simple preventative measures can keep you from getting sick.

An investigation into a salmonella outbreak that involves three states, but mainly one household, resulted in 78,164 pounds of Butterball-made turkey products being recalled.

But the recall, announced just before midnight on Wednesday night, affects turkey that should be only in freezers, not refrigerators. If these products are in your refrigerator, throw them out. Then, clean your fridge.

That’s because all the products involved have a sell-by or freeze-by date of July 26, 2018. The also carry a lot code No. 8188 and have “EST. P-7345” inside the USDA inspection label.

So, check for 48-ounce and 16-ounce plastic trays of Butterball Everyday Fresh Ground Turkey with natural flavoring, 85% Lean/15% Fat and 93% Lean/7% Fat; 48-ounce trays Kroger Ground Turkey Fresh 85% Lean — 15% Fat; and 48-ounce trays of Food Lion 15% fat ground turkey with natural flavorings.

If you have any of these, throw them out or return them to the store for a full refund.

A CDC and state of Wisconsin investigation into salmonella outbreak of five people in two states led to this recall. Thursday evening, the CDC said the outbreak now involves six people in three states.

“Wisconsin collected three intact Butterball brand ground turkey samples from a residence where four of the case-patients live,” the USDA recall notice states. “The case-patients and ground turkey Salmonella Schwarzengrund isolates are closely related, genetically.”

Salmonella is one of the most common foodborne illnesses, hitting 1.2 million Americans each year, according to the CDC. It usually hits within 12 to 72 hours of contact and brings four to seven days of diarrhea, stomachaches and fever. About 23,000 people a year have to be hospitalized and 450 die, usually those over 65 years old or under 5 years old.

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Since 1989, David J. Neal’s domain at the Miami Herald has expanded to include writing about Panthers (NHL and FIU), Dolphins, old school animation, food safety, fraud, naughty lawyers, bad doctors and all manner of breaking news. He drinks coladas whole. He does not work Indianapolis 500 Race Day.


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