Traffic is seen heading north along the Florida Turnpike near Homestead as tourists and residents in the Florida Keys leave town on Wednesday, September 6, 2017.
Traffic is seen heading north along the Florida Turnpike near Homestead as tourists and residents in the Florida Keys leave town on Wednesday, September 6, 2017. AL DIAZ adiaz@miamiherald.com
Traffic is seen heading north along the Florida Turnpike near Homestead as tourists and residents in the Florida Keys leave town on Wednesday, September 6, 2017. AL DIAZ adiaz@miamiherald.com

‘Everyone’s freaking out.’ Florida Keys evacuate ahead of Hurricane Irma

September 06, 2017 12:35 PM

UPDATED September 06, 2017 11:50 PM

More Videos

Havana cleans up after Irma but other areas on the island still struggle 2:21

Havana cleans up after Irma but other areas on the island still struggle

NASA video shows active 2017 hurricane season simulation 2:13

NASA video shows active 2017 hurricane season simulation

Unemployment on the rise in Puerto Rico 1:42

Unemployment on the rise in Puerto Rico

FEMA stages site in Hialeah for crews working on clearing storm debris 1:22

FEMA stages site in Hialeah for crews working on clearing storm debris

What Saint Martin looked like hours before Hurricane Irma hit 0:48

What Saint Martin looked like hours before Hurricane Irma hit

Satellite imagery shows 3 hurricanes churning in Atlantic basin 0:35

Satellite imagery shows 3 hurricanes churning in Atlantic basin

FPL workers continue to repair damage from Hurricane Irma 0:40

FPL workers continue to repair damage from Hurricane Irma

Aerial footage shows the devastation from Hurricane Irma in Florida Keys 1:38

Aerial footage shows the devastation from Hurricane Irma in Florida Keys

Sarah Sanders asks press to say what they’re thankful before taking questions 1:41

Sarah Sanders asks press to say what they’re thankful before taking questions

Georgia Dome destroyed after 25 years of use 1:11

Georgia Dome destroyed after 25 years of use

  • NASA video shows active 2017 hurricane season simulation

    How can you see the atmosphere? By tracking what is carried on the wind. Tiny aerosol particles such as smoke, dust, and sea salt are transported across the globe, making visible weather patterns and other normally invisible physical processes. This computer simulation allow scientists to study the physical processes in our atmosphere. By following the sea salt that is evaporated from the ocean, you can see the storms of the 2017 hurricane season.