A month after Irma pounded Biscayne Bay, scientists founded elevated levels of chlorophyll and low salinity that they fear may be an early sign of more trouble for the urban bay where 23-square miles of seagrass meadows have died over the last decade.
A month after Irma pounded Biscayne Bay, scientists founded elevated levels of chlorophyll and low salinity that they fear may be an early sign of more trouble for the urban bay where 23-square miles of seagrass meadows have died over the last decade. Wilfredo Lee AP
A month after Irma pounded Biscayne Bay, scientists founded elevated levels of chlorophyll and low salinity that they fear may be an early sign of more trouble for the urban bay where 23-square miles of seagrass meadows have died over the last decade. Wilfredo Lee AP

The hurricane sent foul water from the sewers into Biscayne Bay. What happens now?

October 22, 2017 10:35 AM

UPDATED October 23, 2017 09:13 PM

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