More Videos

King Tide brings residential flooding to sections of Fort Lauderdale 1:07

King Tide brings residential flooding to sections of Fort Lauderdale

Buildings collapse in Mexico City after strong earthquake 2:02

Buildings collapse in Mexico City after strong earthquake

Hurricane Maria hits the Dominican Republic 0:49

Hurricane Maria hits the Dominican Republic

Hurricane Maria causes river to flood neighborhood in Puerto Rico 0:33

Hurricane Maria causes river to flood neighborhood in Puerto Rico

This surveillance video shows teen returning wallet with $1,500 in cash to Elk Grove resident 0:25

This surveillance video shows teen returning wallet with $1,500 in cash to Elk Grove resident

Miami Dolphins' Ndamukong Suh talks about Timmons, being named team captain 3:45

Miami Dolphins' Ndamukong Suh talks about Timmons, being named team captain

FPL works to restore power to parts of Coral Gables 0:37

FPL works to restore power to parts of Coral Gables

FPL workers continue to repair damage from Hurricane Irma 0:40

FPL workers continue to repair damage from Hurricane Irma

Hurricane Maria recovery in Puerto Rico 1:31

Hurricane Maria recovery in Puerto Rico

7.1 magnitude earthquake rocks Central Mexico  1:47

7.1 magnitude earthquake rocks Central Mexico

  • Sick seagrass in Tuttle Basin

    The urban end of Biscayne Bay that managed to survive decades of causeways and jet skis and dredging, where acres of seagrass grew in water that remained gin clear despite all the pumping and dumping from its coastal neighbors, is sick. Since 2012, more than half the meadow has died, causing great alarm to those who are keeping a close eye on it.

The urban end of Biscayne Bay that managed to survive decades of causeways and jet skis and dredging, where acres of seagrass grew in water that remained gin clear despite all the pumping and dumping from its coastal neighbors, is sick. Since 2012, more than half the meadow has died, causing great alarm to those who are keeping a close eye on it. Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com
The urban end of Biscayne Bay that managed to survive decades of causeways and jet skis and dredging, where acres of seagrass grew in water that remained gin clear despite all the pumping and dumping from its coastal neighbors, is sick. Since 2012, more than half the meadow has died, causing great alarm to those who are keeping a close eye on it. Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com

Seagrass keeps dying in Biscayne Bay. Is it getting too sick to recover?

April 21, 2017 6:01 AM