Ellie Nydick of New York City, Anne and Mike Barrett of Hazlet, New Jersey and Anthony Williams of Miami all watch the solar eclipse at Key Biscayne on February 26, 1998. Although those in South Florida will only see a 72 percent eclipse this year — the path sprawls from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina — looking into the partial eclipse can still be dangerous to the naked eye.
Ellie Nydick of New York City, Anne and Mike Barrett of Hazlet, New Jersey and Anthony Williams of Miami all watch the solar eclipse at Key Biscayne on February 26, 1998. Although those in South Florida will only see a 72 percent eclipse this year — the path sprawls from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina — looking into the partial eclipse can still be dangerous to the naked eye. Nuri Vallbona Miami Herald File
Ellie Nydick of New York City, Anne and Mike Barrett of Hazlet, New Jersey and Anthony Williams of Miami all watch the solar eclipse at Key Biscayne on February 26, 1998. Although those in South Florida will only see a 72 percent eclipse this year — the path sprawls from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina — looking into the partial eclipse can still be dangerous to the naked eye. Nuri Vallbona Miami Herald File

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