Miami Dolphins

Cuts are coming for Dolphins’ receivers, but there’s one their new coach raves about

Dolphins wide receiver Albert Wilson: ‘it’s was definitely a roller coaster’

Miami Dolphins wide receiver Albert Wilson talks to the media after their 31-28 win over the Chicago Bears in a NFL football game at Hard Rock Stadium on Sunday, October 14 2018, in Miami Gardens.
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Miami Dolphins wide receiver Albert Wilson talks to the media after their 31-28 win over the Chicago Bears in a NFL football game at Hard Rock Stadium on Sunday, October 14 2018, in Miami Gardens.

DeVante Parker?

All but gone.

Danny Amendola?

Iffy to stay.

Even Kenny Stills could be at risk, with $4 million in cap savings if he’s cut.

Then there’s Albert Wilson, who’s got the most job security of any Dolphins receiver, and perhaps any Dolphin — period.

Assuming he has no setbacks from last fall’s hip injury, you can pencil Wilson in as a Week 1 starter.

He was the Dolphins’ most explosive receiver (15 yards per catch) a year ago. And his contract — he would cost more against the cap to cut than keep — makes it a no-brainer.

Then there’s this: His new position coach, Karl Dorrell, is a huge fan.

“He was pretty dynamic wasn’t he?” Dorrell said recently. “He’s a very unique player. I’m really excited about him. .... I hear he’s doing a really good job with the recovery process but you could tell when he was on the field, he had a number of ways to affect the defense and to make the defense really pay attention to where he is and things like that.”

Dorrell is in his second-go round with the Dolphins, having coached both their wide receivers and quarterbacks under Tony Sparano.

Those offenses plodded along, in part because of underwhelming team speed. Ted Ginn could stretch the field, but his hands were unreliable.

Not so for Wilson, who had just one drop on 35 targets last year.

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And another plus in Wilson’s column? He fits into Brian Flores’ team-first philosophy.

“I hear he is a very quiet but hardworking guy,” Dorrell said. “That’s kind of what his M.O. has been, which I like. I like that. I like guys that in crunch time moments of a game, in a situation where a big play has to be made, guys come up and do those things.”

Wilson’s size — 5-9, 201 — won’t be held against him either. Dorrell said he does not stick to prototypes, but rather likes a good mix of size and speed.

“You don’t want them all looking the same and doing the same things,” he added. “I don’t think that challenges the defense well enough. I think you need different types because they have different attributes.”

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Dorrell, on the Dolphins’ receivers: “I see some dynamic players. I’ve got different ranges. I have guys that are 6-foot-2, 6-foot-3, down to guys that are under six feet tall. They all have unique qualities. I’ve studied all of their tape, just getting to know the group over the last season, just watching their reps and things that they’ve done. It’s a dynamic group, so I’m excited to get a chance to help them.”

First thing’s first, however. Chris Grier and Brian Flores must decide which of that group will actually be back in 2019.

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Adam Beasley has covered the Dolphins for the Miami Herald since 2012, and has worked for the newspaper since 2006. He is a graduate of Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Communications and has written about sports professionally since 1996.
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