Miami Heat

Heat adds to camp roster, signs former Hurricanes guard Davon Reed

Kyle Alexander speaks about situation with Miami Heat

Forward Kyle Alexander, who went undrafted out of Tennessee this year, is among those competing for a two-way contract from the Heat.
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Forward Kyle Alexander, who went undrafted out of Tennessee this year, is among those competing for a two-way contract from the Heat.

The competition for a Heat two-way contract will include guard Davon Reed.

Reed, who played four seasons for the Miami Hurricanes from 2013-17, signed an Exhibit 10 contract with the Heat, according to a league source. The signing was announced by the Heat on Wednesday.

Exhibit 10 contracts are limited to a $50,000 guarantee and leaves the option open for Reed to eventually play for Miami’s G League affiliate, the Sioux Falls Skyforce, after training camp. Exhibit 10 deals do not count against the salary cap or hard cap and can be converted to two-way contracts.

The addition of the 6-5 and 208-pound Reed brings the Heat’s roster up to 18 players, with both of Miami’s two-way contract spots still empty. An NBA team can carry up to 15 players on its roster during the regular season (not including two two-way contract players), and the Heat’s regular-season roster is likely set with 14 players barring a trade because of its position against the NBA hard cap — Jimmy Butler, Goran Dragic, James Johnson, Kelly Olynyk, Justise Winslow, Dion Waiters, Meyers Leonard, Tyler Herro, Bam Adebayo, Udonis Haslem, Derrick Jones Jr., Duncan Robinson, Kendrick Nunn and KZ Okpala.

The expectation is Reed will compete with forwards Kyle Alexander and Chris Silva and guard Jeremiah Martin during training camp for a two-way contract from the Heat. Alexander, Silva and Martin signed with the Heat earlier this summer on Exhibit 10 deals and are currently the only other players on the roster eligible for a two-way contract.

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The Heat is expected to keep at least one — and potentially both — of its two-way contract spots open entering training camp.

Why? One official in touch with the team’s front office told the Miami Herald because the Heat has no room under the hard cap to sign any more players to a standard contract, it’s trying to entice players to sign Exhibit 10 contracts with the expectation that they will have a legitimate chance to earn a two-way contract during training camp.

Reed, who was selected 32nd overall by the Suns in the 2017 draft, has appeared in 31 NBA games (one start) over his two-year professional career. The 24-year-old appeared in 10 games for the Pacers last season, averaging 1.2 points and 0.6 rebounds in 4.7 minutes.

Also last season, Reed played in 34 games for the Pacers’ G League affiliate, the Fort Wayne Mad Ants. He averaged 13.9 points, 6.1 rebounds, 3.3 assists and 1.5 steals while shooting 39.7 percent from the field and 32.6 percent on threes during his time with the Mad Ants.

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Reed played in four Las Vegas summer league games with the Warriors in July, averaging 6.5 points, 3.5 rebounds and 1.8 assists while shooting 32 percent from the field.

During his college career at Miami, Reed finished with the 16th-most points in program history with 1,343. He also ranked seventh in three-point field goals made with 202 and he started 99 of the 131 games he played in.

Reed averaged a career-high 14.9 points and 4.8 rebounds to lead the Hurricanes to the NCAA Tournament as a senior in 2016-17.

Beyond the numbers, Reed features an intriguing frame. He measured in at 6-5.5 at the 2017 NBA combine with a 7-foot wingspan, which was the third-longest wingspan among guards at the Combine that year.

Miami can still add other two-way candidates to its roster before the start of training camp on Oct. 1, with NBA teams allowed to carry up to 20 players during training camp and the preseason.

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Anthony Chiang covers the Miami Heat for the Miami Herald. He attended the University of Florida and was born and raised in Miami.
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