Weather

Alberto weakening after landfall in Panhandle

Emily Muller, left, and her father, Bob, walk through the rain as Subtropical Storm Alberto makes landfall on Monday, May 28, 2018, in Destin, Fla.
Emily Muller, left, and her father, Bob, walk through the rain as Subtropical Storm Alberto makes landfall on Monday, May 28, 2018, in Destin, Fla. AP

Subtropical Storm Alberto made landfall just east of Pensacola on Monday evening, powered by winds of up to 45 miles per hour while drenching the Florida Panhandle with rain.

According to the National Hurricane Center's 8 p.m. advisory, the storm was moving inland across the Florida Panhandle and Alabama, threatening flash floods and up to eight inches of steady rain. Forecasters expected the storm to weaken as it moved farther inland.

Meanwhile, the flood watch for all of South Florida was canceled earlier Monday, the National Weather Service announced.

"While some heavy showers remain possible across the area today, the risk of flooding for South Florida has diminished,'' said the forecast, posted at 11:45 a.m. Monday. "Small Craft Advisory are still in effect for the Atlantic waters and high risk of rip currents continues for all South Florida beaches.''

The flood watch was in effect while Subtropical Storm Alberto slowly climbed up the Gulf coast.

A tropical storm warning was still in effect for Aucilla River to the Okaloosa/Walton County line. Forecasters said isolated tornadoes were possible through the night over parts of Gerogia and southeast Alabama.

Alberto was forecast to move over Alabama late Monday and early Tuesday as a subtropical depression, with the weather system weakening but drenching Tennessee and the Great Lakes region by midweek.

The storm is the first of this year's hurricane season, which officially starts June 1.



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