Flanked by Parkland parents and students, Florida Gov. Rick Scott signed a gun-safety measure championed by students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in March. The act requires a safe-school officer in every school and provided $67 million to school districts to use that money to train and arm school personnel who weren’t classroom teachers. Many school districts, however, were averse to arming non-sworn employees and preferred using sworn law enforcement officers instead, asking state officials to redirect that funding.
Flanked by Parkland parents and students, Florida Gov. Rick Scott signed a gun-safety measure championed by students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in March. The act requires a safe-school officer in every school and provided $67 million to school districts to use that money to train and arm school personnel who weren’t classroom teachers. Many school districts, however, were averse to arming non-sworn employees and preferred using sworn law enforcement officers instead, asking state officials to redirect that funding. Mark Wallheiser AP Photo
Flanked by Parkland parents and students, Florida Gov. Rick Scott signed a gun-safety measure championed by students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in March. The act requires a safe-school officer in every school and provided $67 million to school districts to use that money to train and arm school personnel who weren’t classroom teachers. Many school districts, however, were averse to arming non-sworn employees and preferred using sworn law enforcement officers instead, asking state officials to redirect that funding. Mark Wallheiser AP Photo

Florida Influencers: Tallahassee far from done on guns after Parkland

More from the series

The Florida Influencers Series

This election year, the Miami Herald, the Bradenton Herald and El Nuevo Herald are driving a conversation on the important issues facing our state. We’ve assembled a panel of 50 influential Floridians to offer their views.

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July 30, 2018 05:00 AM