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Crocodile jumps out of a lake and kills the pastor who was conducting a mass baptism

In June 2000, the Miami Seaquarium officially opened one of the largest Nile crocodile exhibits in Florida. In Africa, the Nile crocodile accounts for more human deaths than any other carnivorous animal.  On June 3, 2018, a crocodile jumped out of the water along Lake Abaya in southern Ethiopia and killed a Protestant pastor as he conducted a baptism ceremony.
In June 2000, the Miami Seaquarium officially opened one of the largest Nile crocodile exhibits in Florida. In Africa, the Nile crocodile accounts for more human deaths than any other carnivorous animal. On June 3, 2018, a crocodile jumped out of the water along Lake Abaya in southern Ethiopia and killed a Protestant pastor as he conducted a baptism ceremony. Miami Herald file photo

A mass baptism along an African lake turned tragic when a crocodile crashed the ceremony and killed the presiding pastor.

According to the BBC, the Protestant pastor, identified as the Rev. Docho Eshete, was conducting the religious ceremony for about 80 people on Sunday at a lake in southern Ethiopia.

As he baptized one person and moved on to another, the croc jumped out of the lake and grabbed the pastor, dragging him away from the startled congregants and swimming off with the reverend.

After the attack, several of the people, along with fishermen who happened to be in the area and heard the commotion, grabbed fishing nets and threw them into Lake Abaya to try and stop the crocodile from taking the vicar out of reach.

"They only managed to get the dead body," an officer from the Arba Minch region, 300 miles south of Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, told the BBC.

The wounds were too severe. Eshete was bitten on his back, legs and hands.

The crocodile escaped.

According to The Telegraph, Protestant baptism services in Africa are often conducted by rivers or lakes. The individual being baptized is fully or partially immersed in the water, which recalls the baptism of Jesus Christ by John the Baptist in the River Jordan. But these ceremonies are often fraught with danger. Abaya, Ethiopia’s second largest lake, is known to have a large crocodile population.

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