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Lightning strike hits North Myrtle Beach shore. Video shows why you don’t swim in a storm

Lightning strikes ocean shore in South Carolina

Bolts of lightning struck the ocean shore in North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, during a thunderstorm on July 5, 2019. The National Weather Service had said thunderstorms in the area could produce “frequent and deadly lightning.”
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Bolts of lightning struck the ocean shore in North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, during a thunderstorm on July 5, 2019. The National Weather Service had said thunderstorms in the area could produce “frequent and deadly lightning.”

A video captured from a condo in North Myrtle Beach shows just what happens when lightning hits the shore.

The lightning bolt struck the South Carolina coastline during a July 5 storm, according to the video posted on Storyful.

A storm in the area that day had the potential to produce “frequent and deadly lightning,” the National Weather Service warned.

Joe LaDew caught the lightning strike on video from a balcony on the beach. He said the beach was mostly empty as the thunderstorm moved through, according to Storyful.

Lightning can be deadly for anyone in the water, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Anyone in the water should get out and find shelter during a thunderstorm, NOAA warned.

“Lightning doesn’t strike the ocean as much as land,” NOAA said. “But when it does, it spreads out over the water, which acts as a conductor. It can hit boats that are nearby, and electrocute fish that are near the surface.”

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Charles Duncan covers what’s happening right now across North and South Carolina, from breaking news to fun or interesting stories from across the region. He holds degrees from N.C. State University and Duke and lives two blocks from the ocean in Myrtle Beach.
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