Miami-Dade County

Your Miami-Dade property tax bills have gone up. Here’s why

Although property tax rates in most cities in Miami-Dade County remained steady, higher property values increased tax bills slightly. Tax bills go out on Oct. 31. The Miami Herald calculated what the city portion of tax bills would look like.
Although property tax rates in most cities in Miami-Dade County remained steady, higher property values increased tax bills slightly. Tax bills go out on Oct. 31. The Miami Herald calculated what the city portion of tax bills would look like. Miami-Dade County Property Appraiser's Office

When property tax bills go out Oct. 31, most will be a few bucks higher than last year’s.

Although property tax rates in most cities in Miami-Dade County remained steady, higher property values will increase tax bills slightly.

Not counting new construction, property values increased by $16.8 billion from 2018 to 2019 countywide. Preliminary taxable values, which includes new construction, increased by $18.5 billion since last year, according to data from the Miami-Dade County Property Appraiser’s office.

Two cities, Key Biscayne and Virginia Gardens, were exceptions. For them, preliminary taxable values declined. Virginia Gardens dropped 0.7%, while Key Biscayne dropped 2.6% or $336 million — for the second year in a row. Part of the decline in Key Biscayne was due to less new construction.

Cities and other taxing entities had to approve their budgets and tax rates before Oct. 1, when the new fiscal year started. Tax bills are mailed Oct. 31.

In most circumstances, the majority of a city’s general fund revenue comes from property taxes, but other sources include grants, fines and other taxes.

A tax bill includes not only city taxes but also taxes levied by the county, school board, Miami-Dade Children’s Trust, the South Florida Water Management District and other entities.

County residents will also see an increase in property tax rates from Miami-Dade County Public Schools as the result of a November 2018 tax referendum to pay teachers more and increase the number of school police officers.

Although some cities made small cuts to their property tax rates, most of the cuts were offset by higher property values. Here’s how city tax bills have changed and what local governments are spending it on.

How bills have changed

The Miami Herald used data from the Miami-Dade County Property Appraiser’s office to show the changes in tax bills for each city in Miami-Dade County.

A reporter calculated these numbers using 2019 median assessed home values assuming the owner qualified for the standard homestead exemption and that home’s assessed value increased by 1.9% in 2019 — the maximum allowed by law this year for an owner-occupied home — and a city’s property tax and debt rate in 2018 and 2019 for every $1,000 of taxable property. Results were rounded up to the nearest dollar and percentage changes were rounded to the nearest decimal point.

The 2019 median assessed home values were used to calculate the median changes in tax bills from 2018 to 2019 with property tax rates to show the difference using one constant value. In some cases, the city’s property tax rate and those with debt services taken through property taxes were added up together to reflect a total property tax rate.

This formula only considers the city property tax rate and does not include county tax rates or other rates including, fire and rescue, library and more that could also affect someone’s final bill. Here are the year-to-year changes:

Aventura

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $237,079

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $323 with a city property tax rate of $1.7261

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $331 with a city property tax rate of $1.7261

▪ $8 difference, 2.5% increase in the bill

IMG_CBB25_CityHall_News__3_1_D6EAVEPB_L414266810.JPG
Roberto Koltun rkoltun@miamiherald.com

Bal Harbour

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $681,498

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $1,241 with a city property tax rate of $1.9654

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $1,267 with a city property tax rate of $1.9654

▪ $26 difference, 2.1% increase in the bill

001 Village Hall DS
David Santiago dsantiago@elnuevoherald.com

Bay Harbor Islands

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $198,592

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $553 with a city property tax rate of $3.7199

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $552 with a city property tax rate of $3.6245

▪ $1 difference, 0.2% decrease in the bill

Biscayne Park

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $209,615

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $1,548 with a city property tax rate of $9.7000

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $1,587 with a city property tax rate of $9.7000

▪ $39 difference, 2.5% increase in the bill

Coral Gables

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $415,920

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $2,034 with a city property tax rate of $5.5590

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $2,078 with a city property tax rate of $5.5590

▪ $44 difference, 2.2% increase in the bill

Coral Gables City Hall.jpg
Lance Dixon/Miami Herald archives

Cutler Bay

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $153,000

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $251 with a property tax rate of $2.4323

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $256 with a property tax rate of $2.4323

▪ $5 difference, 2% increase in the bill

Doral

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $250,000

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $380 with a property tax rate of $1.9000

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $427 with a property tax rate of $2.0872

▪ $47 difference, 12.4% increase in the bill

El Portal

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $182,590

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $1,100 with a city property tax rate of $8.3000

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $1,129 with a city property tax rate of $8.3000

▪ $29 difference, 3% increase in the bill

Florida City

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $68,671

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $134 with a city property tax rate of $7.1858

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $144 with a city property tax rate of $7.1858

▪ $10 difference, 7.5% increase in the bill

Golden Beach

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $1,855,037

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $15,162 with a city property tax rate of $8.4000

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $15,458 with a city property tax rate of $8.4000

▪ $296 difference, 2% increase in the bill

Hialeah

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $115,822

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $415 with a city property tax rate of $6.3018

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $429 with a city property tax rate of $6.3018

▪ $14 difference, 3.4% increase in the bill

Hialeah Gardens

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $113,904

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $330 with a city property tax rate of $5.1613

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $341 with a city property tax rate of $5.1613

▪ $11 difference, 3.3% increase in the bill

Homestead

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $107,890

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $373 with a city property tax rate of $6.4515

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $384 with a city property tax rate of $6.4015

▪ $11 difference, 3% increase in the bill

Homestead 01 EKM.JPG
Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com

Indian Creek

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $13,637,726

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $86,961 with a city property tax rate of $6.4000

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $87,235 with a city property tax rate of $6.3000

▪ $274 difference, 0.3% increase in the bill

Key Biscayne

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $715,904

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $2,064 with a city property tax rate of $3.1000

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $2,171 with a city property tax rate of $3.1950

▪ $107 difference, 5.2% increase in the bill

Medley

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $76,768

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $169 with a city property tax rate of $6.3000

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $143 with a city property tax rate of $5.0500

▪ $26 difference, 15.4% decrease in the bill

Miami

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $199,963

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $1,204 with a city property tax rate of $8.0300

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $1,229 with a city property tax rate of $7.9900

▪ $25 difference, 2.1% increase in the bill

Miami Beach

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $252,670

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $1,193 with a city property tax rate of $5.8888

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $1,249 with a city property tax rate of $6.0221

▪ $56 difference, 4.7% increase in the bill

MiamiBeachCityHall.jpg

Miami Gardens

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $101,904

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $410 with a city property tax rate of $7.9072

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $422 with a city property tax rate of $7.8325

▪ $12 difference, 3% increase in the bill

Miami Lakes

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $216,409

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $385 with a city property tax rate of $2.3127

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $394 with a city property tax rate of $2.3127

▪ $9 difference, 2.3% increase in the bill

MIami Lakes Town Hall.jpg
Marjie Lambert mlambert@miamiherald.com

Miami Shores

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $262,376

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $1,767 with a city property tax rate of $8.3192

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $1,804 with a city property tax rate of $8.3009

▪ $37 difference, 2.1% increase in the bill

Miami Springs

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $208,417

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $1,164 with a city property tax rate of $7.3500

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $1,190 with a city property tax rate of $7.3300

▪ $26 difference, 2.2% increase in the bill

IMG_city_hall_4_1_3376MLIF_L195454512.JPG

North Bay Village

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $178,525

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $790 with a city property tax rate of $6.1463

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $807 with a city property tax rate of $6.1179

▪ $17 difference, 2.2% increase in the bill

north bay village city hall horiz 2.jpg
Sarah Blaskey

North Miami

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $93,944

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $330 with a city property tax rate of $7.5000

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $343 with a city property tax rate of $7.5000

▪ $13 difference, 4% increase in the bill

North Miami Beach

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $99,907

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $350 with a city property tax rate of $7.0158

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $353 with a city property tax rate of $6.8194

▪ $3 difference, 0.9% increase in the bill

Opa-locka

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $72,241

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $218 with a city property tax rate of $9.8000

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $231 with a city property tax rate of $9.8000

▪ $13 difference, 6% increase in the bill

cityhall
Walter Michot wmichot@miamiherald.com

Palmetto Bay

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $312,787

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $588 with a city property tax rate of $2.2387

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $591 with a city property tax rate of $2.2000

▪ $3 difference, 0.5% increase in the bill

Palmetto Bay village hall.jpg
Although property tax rates in most cities in Miami-Dade County remained steady, higher property values will increase tax bills slightly. Marjie Lambert mlambert@miamiherald.com

Pinecrest

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $540,199

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $1,176 with a city property tax rate of $2.3990

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $1,201 with a city property tax rate of $2.3990

▪ $25 difference, 2.1% increase in the bill

South Miami

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $239,871

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $816 with a city property tax rate of $4.3000

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $836 with a city property tax rate of $4.3000

▪ $20 difference, 2.5% increase in the bill

Sunny Isles Beach

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $290,965

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $530 with a city property tax rate of $2.2000

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $542 with a city property tax rate of $2.2000

▪ $12 difference, 2.3% increase in the bill

Surfside

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $370,036

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $1,440 with a city property tax rate of $4.5000

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $1,439 with a city property tax rate of $4.4000

▪ $1 difference, 0.07% decrease in the bill

Sweetwater

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $109,383

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $237 with a city property tax rate of $3.9948

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $246 with a city property tax rate of $3.9948

▪ $9 difference, 3.8% increase in the bill

Unincorporated Miami-Dade County

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $145,200

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $184 with a property tax rate of $1.9283

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $189 with a property tax rate of $1.9283

▪ $5 difference, 2.7% increase in the bill

Virginia Gardens

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $143,087

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $475 with a city property tax rate of $5.1000

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $489 with a city property tax rate of $5.1000

▪ $14 difference, 3% increase in the bill

West Miami

▪ 2019 median assessed residential value: $172,320

▪ Median tax bill 2018: $842 with a city property tax rate of $6.8858

▪ Median tax bill 2019: $865 with a city property tax rate of $6.8858

▪ $23 difference, 3% increase in the bill

How local governments spend property tax revenue

Property taxes are usually the largest source of revenue for cities, and this could increase as property values and tax rates rise. With extra projected revenues going into the general fund, which is largely made of property taxes but also income from other sources, cities look to spend money on more positions, employee salaries, benefits, pensions and more. Here’s a look at the county’s most populous cities and the unincorporated areas where the county provides municipal services and how they adjusted their 2019-20 budgets.

Unincorporated Miami-Dade County

Population: More than 1 million

With a few million additional dollars in revenue from unincorporated Miami-Dade County, more money was able to go to police and parks, said Jennifer Moon, the county’s deputy mayor and budget director.

There was a $4 million increase in property tax revenue in this year’s unincorporated area general fund. Only 30% to 40% of that comes from property taxes, Moon said.

Expenses for every department went up, but there were significant increases for police, up $40 million, and parks, up $5 million. Ninety positions were added by the police department at a cost of $10 million.

POLICERIDEALONGMH04.JPG
Miami-Dade County added $40 million to its police department budget for the 2019-20 fiscal year. ALEXIA FODERE For The Miami Herald

Miami

Population: About 470,000

Even with its second lowest tax rate in 55 years, Miami’s budget director, Chris Rose, said the city is predicting $36.8 million more in property tax revenue.

The city’s general fund, which is mainly supported by property tax revenues, grew by $44.5 million. Property tax revenues make up 83% of that.

The administration proposed a smaller budget than the total amount spent in the current fiscal year. The total operating budget is $1.13 billion, about $132 million lower than this year. The city had a 10.5% increase in property values.

Salaries for city employees grew by $38.3 million, and retirement contributions for the same employees grew by $14.3 million. A lot of this increase comes from 81 new positions that were added to this year’s budget, Rose said.

“It’s well in excess of what we had in property tax growth,” Rose said.

Twenty additional positions were created for the police department, including 17 civilian positions intended to free officers to do law enforcement work. Twenty-four positions were added to fire and rescue, with 17 of them in a specialized rescue unit. Positions in code compliance, the parks department, solid waste and the risk management department were also added.

Hialeah

Population: About 238,000

This year’s budget had the highest projected revenues since the 2008 recession because of new construction and an increase in property values.

Hialeah’s budget of more than $327 million had an 8.2% increase in property tax revenue, which comes from growth in the value of existing properties and new construction. Almost $67.7 million in property tax revenue was predicted.

But even though the city has more money, Mayor Carlos Hernández told the Miami Herald that expenses in 2019 are high because the city is paying more in employee healthcare and pensions than previously.

The city’s pension contribution increased by $2.5 million this year and has risen by $12.9 million in the last decade, Hernández wrote in a letter to city commissioners and residents.

“This year, we finally have the same revenues that we had in 2008 with the expenses of 2018-19,” he said at the second public budget hearing in September.

The city will also spend some of the extra revenue on improving buildings that need upgrades like a new roof or a fresh coat of paint.

IMG_1002HialeahSnapShot0_3_1_1VGL6305_L500959011.JPG
This year’s budget had the highest projected revenues since the 2008 recession because of new construction and an increase in property values. Foto de cortesía

Miami Beach

Population: About 91,000

Despite a slight increase of 3.1% in property tax revenues, the city of Miami Beach said it was still running based on preliminary projections.

There was about $5.2 million more in property tax revenue, said John Woodruff, the city’s chief financial officer. But the city was still projected to be $4.4 million short.

The taxable value of property in the city increased slightly from last year, but the growth of property values has slowed in the last decade, resulting in the preliminary budget shortfall.

Twenty-eight administrative positions, mostly vacant, were cut from the budget. Efficiencies in various departments were also implemented, redistributing some of the workload to existing positions. This saved the city $1.6 million alone, Woodruff said.

Administrators didn’t want to cut parts of the budget that would affect public safety, parks or after-school programs and have residents feel an impact, Woodruff said.

“We are trying hard so the public wouldn’t even know the difference, if you will,” Woodruff said. “That was the goal.”

McArthur_Causeway_Traffic_MJO_1.JPG
The taxable value of property in Miami Beach increased, but the growth of property values was less than expected, forcing the city to cut some positions. MATIAS J. OCNER mocner@miamiherald.com

Homestead

Population: About 70,000

Compared to last year, the city of Homestead had almost $1.4 million more in property tax revenues.

Increases in this year’s general fund, which combines property tax revenue and other funding resources, are going to the police pension, capital improvement projects in various departments, the cost of elections, two new building inspectors, increases in the cost of health insurance for city employees and annual roadway and sidewalk projects, said Zachery Good, the city’s spokesman.

North Miami

Population: About 62,000

The tax rate in the city of North Miami was the same as last year’s, but because of an increase in property values, the city was able to collect more revenue.

Most of this year’s extra property tax revenue, about 60%, has gone to the city’s community redevelopment agency, which redevelops communities in areas considered slums or blighted. Housing initiatives were allocated $2.5 million from the agency’s funds, said North Miami City Manager Larry Spring.

Another $1.2 million from the city’s general revenue fund went into the city’s reserves account to replace money from an operating deficit last year.

“We hit all four corners for things people wanted,” Spring said.

  Comments