Business Monday

South Florida CEOs’ leisure activities include family time, fitness

Dr. Alejandro Badia is an orthopedic surgeon who leads a network of orthopedic urgent care centers called OrthoNOW based in Doral. The company has locations in Miami-Dade and Broward counties.
Dr. Alejandro Badia is an orthopedic surgeon who leads a network of orthopedic urgent care centers called OrthoNOW based in Doral. The company has locations in Miami-Dade and Broward counties.

This week’s question: How much free time away from work do you budget yourself per day? What do you do with it?

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My health and well-being is paramount as I need to be the best I can be for my patients, children and business. In fact, it is while I engage in these activities that I think of new and innovative offerings for my private practice, Badia Hand to Shoulder Center and OrthoNOW, the nation’s only network of orthopedic urgent care center franchise which I founded. I keep fit playing tennis, going to the gym and cycling about an hour two-to-three times a week. I also spend quality time with my kids visiting some of Miami’s great family destinations, parks and beaches.

Alejandro Badia, orthopedic surgeon and founder, OrthoNOW

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I think it makes more sense to think in terms of priorities and look at things on a weekly basis because every day can be so different. Some weeks I have more pressing client demands and others I have travel and speaking commitments for the American Bar Association. I am a big believer that you can have it all, just not all at the same time. Over the course of the month, I make sure I find time away from work for my priorities, which include spending time with family and friends, going to the gym and being involved with community activities.

Hilarie Bass, co-president, Greenberg Traurig

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The hotel business is 24/7, but I make it a point to take time for myself, family and friends. I like to work out, enjoy outdoor activities, movies and Netflix.

Peggy Benua, general manager, Dream South Beach

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My family has always been very active. In my free time I like to move, so I always find time to exercise, whether riding my bike to the grocery store or working out in the gym. I also spend time talking to family and friends and then I hang out in my garden or look for fun stuff to do around town.

Meg Daly, president and CEO, Friends of The Underline

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My work day averages 10 hours a day and my time away from work activities is divided into two segments; 1) Before, and 2) After. Before work, I exercise/condition my body and prepare my emotions to work. After work, I do whatever I want to do — except work. I don’t take work home and I don’t work on the weekends — work does not dictate my lifestyle. My lifestyle determines how effective I am when I work.

T. Willard Fair, president and CEO, Urban League of Greater Miami

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I really like the work I do and often find I am too busy to take sufficient time away from daily work. However, I know it’s important to take time away from the office to recharge and reconnect with friends and family so I do make a point to take time off, including vacations with my husband.

Vicky Garrigo, market head, U.S. Southeastern Region Private Banking, HSBC Bank

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Having a locally owned, independent business makes it very hard to plan for free time. When I do have it, I try my best to read, bike, listen to music, watch the Heat or the Canes basketball games, and spend time with my family. Books & Books, though, is never very far away.

Mitch Kaplan, founder, Books & Books

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I’m a big believer that the concept of work/life harmony is unrealistic. Finding balance means prioritizing and making the time for both parts of life — the personal and professional. There are times when we have to hunker down at work because our responsibilities demand it, while other times we tend to our families, community and personal interests. In my free time, I’m focused on enjoying time with my wife, Megan, and our three children.

Alan Kleber, managing director, JLL (Jones Lang LaSalle)

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I live and breathe the automobile business so I have very little free time. I enjoy exercising every day and taking walks. I also spend free time reading books about business, history and other nonfiction.

Mario Murgado, president and CEO, Brickell Motors

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A work/life balance is crucial for anyone in the workforce, however, as a small business owner, maintaining a healthy balance and finding time away from one’s business can be difficult. I make a concerted effort to exercise four or five times a week in the morning before I begin my workday. During the evening hours, my time is spent with my family.

Steve Perricone, president and owner, Perricone’s Restaurant

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I like to have the time from 6 to 8 in the evening free to exercise. I rarely make appointments in that window. It is time for me alone. Also, I enjoy family dinners as often as possible and like to include guests. On the weekends, I take more time to relax. I also try to spend time in the wilderness each year. Being disconnected from all communication is helpful to me. Since I live at sea level, the mountains provide a nurturing context.

Craig Robins, president and CEO, Dacra

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At least 90 minutes . . . 1/3 selfish pleasure, 1/3 selfless pleasure, and 1/3 “Movie Time.”

David Samson, president, Miami Marlins

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My fellow CEOs know that this is a 24/7 world, where change is constant and being agile and responsive is a priority. Running the largest utility in Florida, where a bolt of lightning can impact our business, I have no set schedule for free time. Instead, I catch opportunities whenever I can with my family to enjoy this beautiful state. I am blessed to live in a great state with abundant opportunities to enjoy the leisure time I get.

Eric Silagy, president and CEO, Florida Power & Light

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Definitely not enough! I run my days on a tyranny-of-the-urgent model. But, when I do get free time, I spend as much of it outside and on the water as possible. We live in Miami because of our incredible natural resources: Biscayne Bay, the beaches, the Everglades, Fairchild and the Kampong, RF Orchids, boating, fishing, kayaking, picking mangoes from trees and lobsters from the sea (in season only, of course!). I don’t think that most people in Miami take full advantage of the incredible — and mostly free — offerings that are at the heart of healthy living in South Florida. My hope is that the Miamians of the future will come to recognize Biscayne Bay and the Everglades as natural extensions of their own backyards, and that, as such, they begin to take care of these landmarks as they would their own homes.

Rachel Silverstein, executive director, Miami Waterkeeper

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