Business Monday

CEO’s are asked: How does the threat of rising seas affect your business planning?

Ades
Ades

On a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 being “inconsequential” and 10 being “critical,” please rate how the threat of rising seas affects your business planning today. In a sentence or two, please explain your answer.

2. Fortunately or unfortunately, since my business is global in nature, it does not affect my business planning directly. However – personally – rising sea levels are absolutely critical to the survival of Miami as a leading city of the 21st century.

Daniel Ades, managing partner, Kawa Capital Management

----------

Sea rise is not very relevant to my business planning, so I give it a 3. However, more and more organizations see the need to develop positions regarding sea rise, and smart communicators are helping them craft strategies.

Christine Barney, CEO, RBB

----------

On a scale from 1 to 10 with a 10 being critical, the threat of rising seas affecting our business planning is a 1. Global climate change has had no negative direct impact on our business planning.

Richard Behar, founder and president, Capital Clothing Corp.

----------

Rating: 8. This issue rarely comes up. However I believe it is in the back of everyone’s mind and the work to improve our drainage plus plans for this should continue.

Alice Cervera Lamadrid, managing partner, Cervera Real Estate

----------

5. Because I am inland and west of the I-95, sea level rise is not a psychical threat but rather a personal responsibility. The issue of sea level rise that is caused by carbon emission is a broader question and fundamental to the mission at ECOTECH visions.

Pandwe Gibson, executive director, EcoTech Visions

----------

I would rate the threat of rising seas at a 4 in regard to our current business planning. At this point, we are working with the Greater Miami Hotel & Beaches Association to support beach re-nourishment.

Julie Grimes, managing partner, Hilton Bentley Hotel

----------

4. Since we do business citywide and also because we are members of the GMCC, we know that sea rise will have a negative effect on everyone that we do business with… eventually. Most people are under the misperception that this is a Miami Beach issue.

Ann Machado, founder and president, Creative Staffing

----------

1. It’s a possible long term issue with the potential impact being limited to our facilities in low-lying areas, which would be manageable for us. Our greater concern is for our team members who live close to the water finding their homes damaged.

Victor Mendelson, co-president, HEICO

----------

5. This isn’t a major concern for real estate buyers or lenders at the moment, but sea level rise is a real issue will become front and center with time. We are getting ahead of the problem by incorporating sustainable design principles into all of our affected projects.

Nitin Motwani, managing principal, Miami Worldcenter Associates

----------

7. The threat of rising tides could cripple our already strained transportation network – repair of drainage infrastructure wreaks havoc on traffic and thus diminish our quality of life. On a business level, for us, it can certainly affect the fish supply, both the quality and quantity of the fish we source. Our efforts are keenly focused on finding fish from sustainable sources, and if our delicate marine ecosystems are damaged, more than just the seafood supply chain is hurt, our environment may very well be irreversibly hurt for generations to come.

Abe Ng, founder and CEO of Sushi Maki

----------

1. We encourage and expect the local government to take this threat extremely seriously. However, it doesn’t affect our business planning strategy.

Todd Orestsky, co-founder, Pipeline Brickell

----------

10. We have a major campus, the Wolfson Campus, just two blocks west of Biscayne Bay and others such as MDC-West and Homestead that reside just a few feet above sea-level. A rise in sea level would greatly affect access to these campuses, but if that was the case, hundreds of other government and business centers would also be impacted. It’s quite unnerving to think about.

Eduardo Padrón, president, Miami Dade College

----------

1. EarlyShares is a digital company, so it’s not something I worry about from a business perspective on a daily basis. That said, as a resident of Miami Beach, I am quite concerned about the impact of sea level rise on our community at large.

Joanna Schwartz, CEO and co-founder, EarlyShares

----------

3. I think the above issue (traffic and infrastructure) are more immediate issues that need to be addressed. In my opinion, the issue of rising seas will be more of federal issue since it impacts all coastal states.

Dave Seleski, president and CEO, Stonegate Bank

----------

I would say it is a ‘5.’ From a business perspective, the increased concern and attention paid to sea-level rise is not only a benefit to our community but a benefit to the infrastructure consulting nature of our practice. Sea-level rise negatively affects our shorelines, water infrastructure, quality of drinking water, roads and related planning and economic costs.

Darryl K. Sharpton, president and CEO, The Sharpton Group

----------

7. We’re most concerned about what keeps our clients up at night, and how we can adapt our business to serve their needs. We have clients whose projects and long-term business strategies may be impacted by rising sea level, and we are working right beside them to protect their interests.

Andrew Smulian, chairman and CEO, Akerman LLP

----------

5. We have planned our new Museum in downtown Miami’s Museum Park so that any facilities below 20 feet are behind water tight doors and sewer links have one-way valves to prevent back surges.

Gillian Thomas, president and CEO, Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science

----------

7. As Feeding South Florida works in the community, a lot of what we do involves driving to many businesses across Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties. As flooding becomes more persistent, it becomes increasingly difficult to navigate through the streets. The effects on agriculture would be more significant. As produce farms begin to have drainage issues, this impacts the community in two ways: 1) Less food to donate to the families who are struggling to put healthy, nutritious food on the table; 2) More reliance on imported produce/agriculture and less on locally grown products, which could drive up the cost of food in the community.

Paco Velez, CEO, Feeding South Florida

----------

10. It’s alarming and something that must be monitored, not just by ‘environmentalists.’ My business is based in and thrives in South Florida. Although we’ve been fortunate enough to grow globally and have built an e-commerce division that could withstand such elements, our brick-and-mortar stores are in low-lying and waterfront areas, and you don’t want to risk those revenue points or the brand awareness that they create.

Alina Villasante, founder, Peace Love World clothing

----------

The threat of rising seas is inconsequential to our business planning due to the nature of our organization.

Marlon Williams, founder and CEO, Fenero

----------

8. Living and working on projects on Miami Beach makes me keenly aware of the threat that rising and King tides pose. In the short term, the new pumps in Miami Beach seem to be really helping. Over the long term, rising seas are a global issue that because of our unique geology and location, makes Miami especially vulnerable.

John Wood, president, Amicon Construction

  Comments