Business Monday

CEO Roundtable: Suggestions on how to unsnarl Miami’s jammed roadways

ADES
ADES

The question: Everyone complains about local traffic. Please suggest one change that could be implemented in the next three years that would improve the situation.

Hire more traffic engineers to synchronize traffic lights and ensure they are optimized for the different time of day traffic patterns.

Daniel Ades, managing partner, Kawa Capital Management

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In addition to managing an increasing number of cars on the road, focus on getting cars off the road by encouraging and incentivizing workplaces to offer more telecommuting. More flexible work arrangements would take cars off the road and add to quality of life.

Christine Barney, CEO, RBB

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Metro Rail connecting the city to the beach. We have to continue to encourage Miamians to get out of their cars and use alternative methods of transportation.

Alice Cervera Lamadrid, managing partner, Cervera Real Estate

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Staggered work times have proven to be an effective method to elevate traffic. This strategy has worked in many cities including Honolulu Hawaii and Shanghai China. In a city like Miami government job would be an ease target and cost neutral target.

Pandwe Gibson, executive director, EcoTech Visions

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Activate the water transportation resource surrounding us. Clean up, maintain and promote the Metromover so it is more appealing to users.

Julie Grimes, managing partner, Hilton Bentley Hotel

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‘Perform each project’s work on major roads on a 24-hour basis, except during rush hours or major events. This would reduce project durations by nearly two-thirds and restore traffic flow faster.’

Victor Mendelson, co-president, HEICO

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‘A street car system connecting Downtown, Midtown, the Design District and Wynwood was approved as part of a global agreement and is close to shovel-ready. This can be implemented within three years with public and private sector support.’

Nitin Motwani, managing principal, Miami Worldcenter Associates

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I think what stands out is bike riding. I love the bike sharing and rental systems popping up all over Metro Miami. ‘If we can find a way to make biking fun, cool and most importantly safe, we might very well be able to put a dent in the traffic challenge. Office buildings need to plan for shower/change facilities and places to park our bicycles. Also, though I’m still learning more about this… commuter trains linking Palm Beach County to Downtown Miami, sounds like a terrific idea.

Abe Ng, founder and CEO of Sushi Maki

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‘The addition of more public bike racks throughout the urban core and allowing alternatives to Taxis like Uber to operate legally in Miami-Dade.’

Todd Orestsky, co-founder, Pipeline Brickell

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We are blessed to live in a community that for the most part has great weather and while there have been some recent tragedies involving cyclists, ‘We truly need more people, of all ages, to consider leaving their cars behind for bikes. However, as has also been recently discussed, we need to create and expand safe bikeways along former rail corridors and adjacent to major roadways where accidents involving vehicles and cyclists have taken place. It does not seem this would require major infrastructure nor large budgets. Build it and they will ride. Cities such as Minneapolis, Portland and San Francisco, to name a few, have proven this. As a side note, Miami Dade College implemented “Get 2 MDC” in 2010 to encourage students, faculty and staff to use mass transit, carpool and bicycles. It’s good for the mind, body and for the environment.

Edouardo Padrón, president, Miami Dade College

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There is nothing worse than sitting in awful traffic and realizing that poorly timed traffic lights are the cause. Smart traffic lights are imperative! The technology can make a huge impact: In Toronto, smart lights reduced travel times by 25 percent and lowered carbon-dioxide emissions by 30 percent.

Joanna Schwartz, CEO and co-founder, EarlyShares

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Further incentivize development adjacent to mass transit. We are very much looking forward to our move to Brickell City Centre, which will provide direct access to the Miami Metromover from our new building. We are particularly excited about the walkability and connectivity Brickell City Centre will have to Miami’s transit network, which will help our people and many others in the community travel in a convenient and more sustainable way.

Andrew Smulian, chairman and CEO, Akerman LLP

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We could try congestion charging like London. It does not require roadwork but does need camera installation and software. We could make it so that cars with two passengers don’t pay. Furthermore, the charges collected can then be put back into the community to improve our public spaces and create community parks and improved bike paths.

Gillian Thomas, president and CEO, Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science

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In my experience at Feeding South Florida, there is a flow of food similar to the flow of traffic. What’s worked for us is to work backwards. What I mean is this: 1) Cars are getting on the highway, 2) Cars are driving on the highway, 3) Cars are getting off the highway, 4) Cars are making their way to their destination. My suggestion is to reduce the amount of vehicles on the road at any one time. a. Work with the business community to voluntarily stagger hours in 30- to 45-minute intervals; b. Take advantage of technology to allow folks to work from home; c. Synchronize the traffic lights.

Paco Velez, CEO, Feeding South Florida

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I think we need to make sure that there is coordination between the state and local governments to ensure that multiple road improvement projects in the same neighborhood aren’t happening simultaneously and that these projects are not planned at the same time as high traffic events like Art Basel and the Boat show, which have such an enormous economic impact on Miami.

John Wood, president, Amicon Construction

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