Pets

More rawhide chews with chemicals that can make your dog sick are on the recall list

United Pet Group expanded its recall of rawhide chew toys with a machine cleaning compound to include 10 retail partner brands.
United Pet Group expanded its recall of rawhide chew toys with a machine cleaning compound to include 10 retail partner brands.

United Pet Group expanded last week's recall of rawhide dog chews that contain machine cleaning chemicals to encompass retail partners’ brands.

The brands now included in the recall are Petco, Good Lovin’, Companion, Dentley’s, Essential Everyday, Exer-Hides, Hill Country Fare, Priority Pet, Enzadent and Dentahex. They join American Beefhide, Digest-eeze and the Healthy Hide brands. Through retail brick-and-morter establishments and online, the chews got clenched in dog teeth nationwide.

Except for Enzadent and Dentahex, the lot codes on the back of the recalled chews’ packages start with AH, AV, A, AI, AO, or AB and the expiration dates are from 6/01/2019 through 5/31/2020. All sizes and weights are included.

For Enzadent or Dentahex, the UPC codes are 17030030181; 17030030167; 17030030174; 17030030198; 17030030228; 17030030235; 17030030242; and 17030030259. Expiration dates are from 6/1/2021 and 5/31/2022.

Consumers with the chews should toss them, take them back to the store of purchase for a refund or return them directly to United Pet Group. To arrange for a refund from the company, call 855-215-4962 from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m.

Both United Pet Group recall notices stated that rawhide chew plants in Mexico, Colombia and a Brazilian supplier used a quaternary ammonium compound mixture as a processing aid. Use of that compound is approved for cleaning food processing equipment. It’s not approved in the United States for making dog rawhide chews.

The expansion notice repeated the original notice’s claim that customers brought a low percentage of complaints for the number of chews covered in the recall. And most of the complaints concerned the malodorous scent the chew emitted.

But, as before, the expansion did admit, “Diarrhea and vomiting were also reported” and “exposure to quaternary ammonium compounds through direct ingestion may cause the following symptoms in dogs: reduced appetite, and gastric irritation including diarrhea and vomiting. These symptoms may require treatment by a veterinarian depending on severity.”

David J. Neal: 305-376-3559, @DavidJNeal

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