Pets

They lived as food-in-waiting. Now, they can live to be waited on and fed

Dogs locked in a cage at a dog meat farm in Wonju, South Korea, Jan. 9.
Dogs locked in a cage at a dog meat farm in Wonju, South Korea, Jan. 9.

A canine odyssey from being food to being fussed over brought 10 dogs Thursday to the Humane Society of Broward County.

They’re some of the 200 dogs that Humane Society International rescued from a dog meat farm in Wonju, South Korea, after convincing the owner to end his business. As one of 17 shelters in the Emergency Placement Partner Program, the HSBC houses animals HSI or the Humane Society of the United States rescues in natural disasters.

HSI says it has saved 770 dogs across South Korea and Asia in a two-year-old campaign to end the dog meat trade, a push before South Korea hosts the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang. This dog meat operation was located in the same Gangwon province as Pyeongchang, 7,677 miles from Fort Lauderdale.

Cherie Wachter, Humane Society of Broward’s vice president of marketing, said the dogs, which range in size from eight pounds to 60 pounds and from six months to a year, should be ready for adoption early next week.

After some rest time, Humane Society trainers will examine the dogs and help get them ready for a new life.

“These dogs don’t know what it’s like to walk on a leash. They don’t know what it’s like to feel grass,” Wachter said. They’ve lived in cages. It’s not like they got the chance to run around and play.”

David J. Neal: 305-376-3559, @DavidJNeal

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