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Former Miami Heat star’s online catfishing saga gets weirder by the day

In this May 30, 2014, file photo, Miami Heat guard Ray Allen gestures after scoring a three-point shot during the first half of Game 6 in the NBA basketball playoffs Eastern Conference finals against the Indiana Pacers in Miami
In this May 30, 2014, file photo, Miami Heat guard Ray Allen gestures after scoring a three-point shot during the first half of Game 6 in the NBA basketball playoffs Eastern Conference finals against the Indiana Pacers in Miami AP File Photo

We’ve heard weird stories involving athletes before but, wow, this one is out there.

Ray Allen is dealing with some heavy stuff right now. It’s a case of he said, he said. Or rather, he clicked, he clicked.

Last week, the former Miami Heat star player alleged he was a victim of “catfishing,” meaning someone communicates with you online with a fictional or wrong identity.

Allen filed an emergency motion in Orange County Circuit Court in Central Florida last Tuesday, seeking to quash the temporary restraining order against Allen obtained by Bryant K. Coleman, who alleges in court records that Allen threatened him with menacing phone calls and that Allen’s “associates” confronted him in public, according to TMZ Sports.

Allen’s Miami attorney, David Markus, said Monday that’s nonsense. Allen is the one being stalked, court documents say.

  

“He [Coleman] posted about Ray’s wife, Ray’s children, Ray’s dog, Ray’s homes, Ray’s wife’s restaurant, and numerous other personal items,” Allen’s motion says. “Coleman not only posted about these things, he would actually post while physically located inside Ray’s wife’s restaurant in Orlando. And he would make sure they knew it, tagging Ray and his wife on those posts.”

The court documents state the Coral Gables resident is “a community leader, both here in Miami and around the country. Ray also is a basketball legend, having recently retired from the National Basketball Association after playing for 18 years for a number of teams, including the Miami Heat. He is a 10-time All-Star and has won two NBA Championships. Unfortunately, Ray is the victim of ‘catfishing.’”

Allen and his wife run the Miami organic fast food restaurant Grown, with a location on South Dixie Highway near Dadeland mall. Earlier this year, they opened a second Grown — in a Walmart Supercenter in Orlando.

An Orange County judge awarded Coleman the temporary restraining order against Allen on Nov. 6, according to TMZ.

  

On Monday, Allen filed a supplementary motion, obtained by the Miami Herald, seeking a court date “at the earliest date available … because of the harm that the false petition and resulting injunction are having on Ray Allen and his family with each date that the matter is not heard.”

Miami Herald food writer Carlos Frias takes a culinary tour at Hard Rock Stadium, including Ray Allen's organic eatery Grown, local craft beer, and Shula Burger.

According to the basketball star’s initial motion, Coleman assumed the identity of a number of “attractive women” for three years in order to reel in Allen, who is married to Shannon Allen. They have four children; Allen has a fifth child from a previous relationship.

“Ray believed he was speaking with these women and communicated with them,” court records say. “Subsequently, the Plaintiff threatened to publicly reveal private information about Ray that he obtained during the period when Ray thought he was communicating with various women.’’

Markus told TMZ that Coleman is making everything up: “As with everything else related to Briant or Bryant Coleman, his petition for a restraining order was filled with lies, falsehoods and fantasies,” he said. “He is a seriously deranged individual who Ray Allen has never met, never spoken with directly or threatened in any way. Coleman is the stalker here who is obsessed with Ray.”

Allen may want to stay off the internet. In 2009, he was forced to close down his Twitter account after an offensive since-deleted tweet emerged. Allen claimed he was hacked.

So @sugarray20 went to @greenrayn20, just like that.

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