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  • Havana cleans up after Irma but other areas on the island still struggle

    Stretches of the famed Malecón boulevard are still closed for repairs and seaside businesses show the scars of 30-foot waves that crashed through the seawall during Hurricane Irma. But tourists have returned to the capital, even as areas hit hard by the storm continue to struggle.

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Stretches of the famed Malecón boulevard are still closed for repairs and seaside businesses show the scars of 30-foot waves that crashed through the seawall during Hurricane Irma. But tourists have returned to the capital, even as areas hit hard by the storm continue to struggle. Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com

Havana quickly cleans up for tourists after hurricane. But other areas have a problem

October 01, 2017 12:00 PM

UPDATED October 06, 2017 06:33 PM

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  • Special tank allows scientists to churn up category 5 hurricane force storms

    Model beach houses take a beating as scientists at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science crank up a one-of-a-kind hurricane simulation tank at the school. Scientist Ben Kirtman, the Director of the Cooperative Institute of Marine & Atmospheric Studies explains how creating Cat 5 force winds and waves in the giant tank help with making predications and future forecasts that help save lives.