View of a wrecked home and belongings scattered by Hurricane Irma in Marathon Key on Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017.
View of a wrecked home and belongings scattered by Hurricane Irma in Marathon Key on Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017. PEDRO PORTAL pportal@miamiherald.com
View of a wrecked home and belongings scattered by Hurricane Irma in Marathon Key on Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017. PEDRO PORTAL pportal@miamiherald.com

In the Florida Keys, riding out the storm may not have been the best choice. But it was enlightening.

September 22, 2017 7:00 AM

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  • In Puerto Rico, which has a long-running addiction crisis, the few programs that help addicts are struggling to provide services.

    Workers from an organization called Mountain Point provide drug-users with packets of clean syringes, mounds of antibacterial wipes and rolls of gauze from a dwindling supply. Their goal in the wake of the storm is to keep opioid users in Puerto Rico free from deadly diseases they could get from injecting drugs.