Janay Washington, right, 20, of North Miami Beach, gives her 5-month-old daughter, Ke'Lanni, a hug as Red Cross nurse Liz Miller, of Placerville, Calif., helps feed her at a Red Cross hurricane shelter set up in the Miami-Dade County Fair Expo Center on Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. The Washingtons were rescued as rising floodwaters surrounded their home during Hurricane Irma.
Janay Washington, right, 20, of North Miami Beach, gives her 5-month-old daughter, Ke'Lanni, a hug as Red Cross nurse Liz Miller, of Placerville, Calif., helps feed her at a Red Cross hurricane shelter set up in the Miami-Dade County Fair Expo Center on Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. The Washingtons were rescued as rising floodwaters surrounded their home during Hurricane Irma. Wilfredo Lee AP
Janay Washington, right, 20, of North Miami Beach, gives her 5-month-old daughter, Ke'Lanni, a hug as Red Cross nurse Liz Miller, of Placerville, Calif., helps feed her at a Red Cross hurricane shelter set up in the Miami-Dade County Fair Expo Center on Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. The Washingtons were rescued as rising floodwaters surrounded their home during Hurricane Irma. Wilfredo Lee AP

Speak a second language? Group needs volunteer translators to help after the storm

September 21, 2017 11:36 AM

UPDATED September 21, 2017 01:56 PM

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