Soldiers and airmen from the Florida Army National Guard load bottled water into helicopters at a staging area at the Marathon International Airport on Wednesday, September 13, 2017.
Soldiers and airmen from the Florida Army National Guard load bottled water into helicopters at a staging area at the Marathon International Airport on Wednesday, September 13, 2017. AL DIAZ adiaz@miamiherald.com
Soldiers and airmen from the Florida Army National Guard load bottled water into helicopters at a staging area at the Marathon International Airport on Wednesday, September 13, 2017. AL DIAZ adiaz@miamiherald.com

‘We’re in here for the long haul:’ National Guard sets up Irma command in Keys

September 13, 2017 08:39 PM

UPDATED September 13, 2017 09:16 PM

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  • NASA video shows active 2017 hurricane season simulation

    How can you see the atmosphere? By tracking what is carried on the wind. Tiny aerosol particles such as smoke, dust, and sea salt are transported across the globe, making visible weather patterns and other normally invisible physical processes. This computer simulation allow scientists to study the physical processes in our atmosphere. By following the sea salt that is evaporated from the ocean, you can see the storms of the 2017 hurricane season.