Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine said there is no pump that can handle the expected storm surge and residents should move inland.
Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine said there is no pump that can handle the expected storm surge and residents should move inland. Carl Juste cjuste@miamiherald.com
Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine said there is no pump that can handle the expected storm surge and residents should move inland. Carl Juste cjuste@miamiherald.com

When Hurricane Irma’s winds arrive, first responders will have to hunker down

September 08, 2017 11:26 AM

UPDATED September 08, 2017 05:49 PM

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  • NASA video shows active 2017 hurricane season simulation

    How can you see the atmosphere? By tracking what is carried on the wind. Tiny aerosol particles such as smoke, dust, and sea salt are transported across the globe, making visible weather patterns and other normally invisible physical processes. This computer simulation allow scientists to study the physical processes in our atmosphere. By following the sea salt that is evaporated from the ocean, you can see the storms of the 2017 hurricane season.