Eddies exist across the world’s oceans and can help fuel hurricanes. A new University of Miami study found that some in the Caribbean may contain a barrier, created when South American rivers dump massive plumes of freshwater into the ocean and prevent deeper cooler water from mixing with warm surface waters.
Eddies exist across the world’s oceans and can help fuel hurricanes. A new University of Miami study found that some in the Caribbean may contain a barrier, created when South American rivers dump massive plumes of freshwater into the ocean and prevent deeper cooler water from mixing with warm surface waters. NASA
Eddies exist across the world’s oceans and can help fuel hurricanes. A new University of Miami study found that some in the Caribbean may contain a barrier, created when South American rivers dump massive plumes of freshwater into the ocean and prevent deeper cooler water from mixing with warm surface waters. NASA

Why do hurricanes get more intense? The clues lie in these huge Caribbean currents

March 01, 2017 07:00 PM

UPDATED March 02, 2017 09:02 AM

More Videos

Special tank allows scientists to churn up category 5 hurricane force storms 2:07

Special tank allows scientists to churn up category 5 hurricane force storms

One week after Irma, Big Pine Key residents return and start to rebuild 2:20

One week after Irma, Big Pine Key residents return and start to rebuild

Overnight clean up operations by North Miami Beach Police to clear the roads. 0:25

Overnight clean up operations by North Miami Beach Police to clear the roads.

Clean up begins after Hurricane Irma in Coral Gables 1:18

Clean up begins after Hurricane Irma in Coral Gables

Timelapse shows Hurricane Irma making its way through Miami Beach 5:17

Timelapse shows Hurricane Irma making its way through Miami Beach

Catastrophic claims specialist help South Florida after Irma 2:14

Catastrophic claims specialist help South Florida after Irma

What Ocean Drive looks like during Hurricane Irma 0:38

What Ocean Drive looks like during Hurricane Irma

Hurricane Irma collapsed a condo in the Keys 0:51

Hurricane Irma collapsed a condo in the Keys

Havana cleans up after Irma but other areas on the island still struggle 2:21

Havana cleans up after Irma but other areas on the island still struggle

Hurricane Irma storm surge destroys Snapper's Restaurant in Key Largo 1:08

Hurricane Irma storm surge destroys Snapper's Restaurant in Key Largo

  • Special tank allows scientists to churn up category 5 hurricane force storms

    Model beach houses take a beating as scientists at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science crank up a one-of-a-kind hurricane simulation tank at the school. Scientist Ben Kirtman, the Director of the Cooperative Institute of Marine & Atmospheric Studies explains how creating Cat 5 force winds and waves in the giant tank help with making predications and future forecasts that help save lives.