Matthew hits North Florida hard, at least four deaths reported

October 07, 2016 08:00 PM

UPDATED October 08, 2016 05:55 AM

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  • NASA video shows active 2017 hurricane season simulation

    How can you see the atmosphere? By tracking what is carried on the wind. Tiny aerosol particles such as smoke, dust, and sea salt are transported across the globe, making visible weather patterns and other normally invisible physical processes. This computer simulation allow scientists to study the physical processes in our atmosphere. By following the sea salt that is evaporated from the ocean, you can see the storms of the 2017 hurricane season.