Landscapers ride in a truck along a stretch of road that's partially flooded from rain triggered by the arrival of Hurricane Matthew, in the eastern district of Nassau, Bahamas, Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016. Forecasters said the storm was on track to roll directly over the capital city before nearing the Florida coast.
Landscapers ride in a truck along a stretch of road that's partially flooded from rain triggered by the arrival of Hurricane Matthew, in the eastern district of Nassau, Bahamas, Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016. Forecasters said the storm was on track to roll directly over the capital city before nearing the Florida coast. Craig Lenihan AP
Landscapers ride in a truck along a stretch of road that's partially flooded from rain triggered by the arrival of Hurricane Matthew, in the eastern district of Nassau, Bahamas, Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016. Forecasters said the storm was on track to roll directly over the capital city before nearing the Florida coast. Craig Lenihan AP

‘Never been this afraid’: Hurricane Matthew targets Bahamas

October 05, 2016 03:14 PM

UPDATED October 05, 2016 05:47 PM

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