One of the chief arguments Florida House Republicans made Friday when they rejected the Senate plan to help 600,000 working poor get health insurance is that it would create a taxpayer-funded entitlement and would be hard to repeal. What they didn’t mention during the debate is that they are entitled to a very generous health insurance package that costs $22,000 a year — with premiums mostly covered by Florida taxpayers. And, over the years, they have rejected any attempts by Gov. Rick Scott to reduce the benefit. For many of the 180 members of the Florida House and Senate, the prospect of having to scramble for cash to pay for medication and doctor visits is not something that keeps them up at night. According to financial disclosure statements, 54 legislators are millionaires and 145 of them are enrolled in the taxpayer-financed State Group Health insurance plan, which includes about 80,000 full-time state workers.
One of the chief arguments Florida House Republicans made Friday when they rejected the Senate plan to help 600,000 working poor get health insurance is that it would create a taxpayer-funded entitlement and would be hard to repeal. What they didn’t mention during the debate is that they are entitled to a very generous health insurance package that costs $22,000 a year — with premiums mostly covered by Florida taxpayers. And, over the years, they have rejected any attempts by Gov. Rick Scott to reduce the benefit. For many of the 180 members of the Florida House and Senate, the prospect of having to scramble for cash to pay for medication and doctor visits is not something that keeps them up at night. According to financial disclosure statements, 54 legislators are millionaires and 145 of them are enrolled in the taxpayer-financed State Group Health insurance plan, which includes about 80,000 full-time state workers. SCOTT KEELER Tampa Bay Times
One of the chief arguments Florida House Republicans made Friday when they rejected the Senate plan to help 600,000 working poor get health insurance is that it would create a taxpayer-funded entitlement and would be hard to repeal. What they didn’t mention during the debate is that they are entitled to a very generous health insurance package that costs $22,000 a year — with premiums mostly covered by Florida taxpayers. And, over the years, they have rejected any attempts by Gov. Rick Scott to reduce the benefit. For many of the 180 members of the Florida House and Senate, the prospect of having to scramble for cash to pay for medication and doctor visits is not something that keeps them up at night. According to financial disclosure statements, 54 legislators are millionaires and 145 of them are enrolled in the taxpayer-financed State Group Health insurance plan, which includes about 80,000 full-time state workers. SCOTT KEELER Tampa Bay Times

State Politics

Florida lawmakers, most of whom oppose Medicaid expansion, benefit from generous tax-subsidized health insurance

June 05, 2015 9:25 PM

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