File photo of Cuban migrants on the Guatemala-Mexico border. After months stranded in Central America, the Cuban migrants began their long-awaited trip north, toward the U.S. border.
File photo of Cuban migrants on the Guatemala-Mexico border. After months stranded in Central America, the Cuban migrants began their long-awaited trip north, toward the U.S. border. Moisés Castillo AP
File photo of Cuban migrants on the Guatemala-Mexico border. After months stranded in Central America, the Cuban migrants began their long-awaited trip north, toward the U.S. border. Moisés Castillo AP

Changes to immigration policy will not stem the Cuban exodus, those on the island say

January 24, 2017 6:00 AM

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