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Son of former Cali cartel boss accuses Netflix of tarnishing his reputation 1:19

Son of former Cali cartel boss accuses Netflix of tarnishing his reputation

Thieves crash truck into store, drive away with ATM 1:38

Thieves crash truck into store, drive away with ATM

Tacoma woman chases man out of the house after he escapes police custody 1:43

Tacoma woman chases man out of the house after he escapes police custody

Wolves beat dogs in teamwork test 2:02

Wolves beat dogs in teamwork test

Dave Barry's 2017 Holiday Gift Guide 5:23

Dave Barry's 2017 Holiday Gift Guide

Special tank allows scientists to churn up category 5 hurricane force storms 2:07

Special tank allows scientists to churn up category 5 hurricane force storms

Richt on his halftime speech and being 10-0 for the first time as head coach 2:25

Richt on his halftime speech and being 10-0 for the first time as head coach

Fins' receivers Stills and Landry: 'Turnovers and penalties killed us' 1:13

Fins' receivers Stills and Landry: 'Turnovers and penalties killed us'

Jay Cutler speaks to media after Miami Dolphins loss against the Oakland Raiders 2:28

Jay Cutler speaks to media after Miami Dolphins loss against the Oakland Raiders

Julius Thomas speaks to media after Miami Dolphins loss against Oakland Raiders 0:47

Julius Thomas speaks to media after Miami Dolphins loss against Oakland Raiders

  • Colombia’s messy peace tries the patience of war-weary nation

    After more than 50 years of conflict, creating peace in Colombia isn’t easy. Coca crops are booming, politically motivated murders are on the rise and new armed groups have rushed to fill the void left by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC.

After more than 50 years of conflict, creating peace in Colombia isn’t easy. Coca crops are booming, politically motivated murders are on the rise and new armed groups have rushed to fill the void left by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC. Pedro Portal el Nuevo Herald
After more than 50 years of conflict, creating peace in Colombia isn’t easy. Coca crops are booming, politically motivated murders are on the rise and new armed groups have rushed to fill the void left by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC. Pedro Portal el Nuevo Herald

Colombia’s messy peace tries the patience of war-weary nation

May 30, 2017 07:20 PM

UPDATED June 02, 2017 04:38 PM

More Videos

Son of former Cali cartel boss accuses Netflix of tarnishing his reputation 1:19

Son of former Cali cartel boss accuses Netflix of tarnishing his reputation

Thieves crash truck into store, drive away with ATM 1:38

Thieves crash truck into store, drive away with ATM

Tacoma woman chases man out of the house after he escapes police custody 1:43

Tacoma woman chases man out of the house after he escapes police custody

Wolves beat dogs in teamwork test 2:02

Wolves beat dogs in teamwork test

Dave Barry's 2017 Holiday Gift Guide 5:23

Dave Barry's 2017 Holiday Gift Guide

Special tank allows scientists to churn up category 5 hurricane force storms 2:07

Special tank allows scientists to churn up category 5 hurricane force storms

Richt on his halftime speech and being 10-0 for the first time as head coach 2:25

Richt on his halftime speech and being 10-0 for the first time as head coach

Fins' receivers Stills and Landry: 'Turnovers and penalties killed us' 1:13

Fins' receivers Stills and Landry: 'Turnovers and penalties killed us'

Jay Cutler speaks to media after Miami Dolphins loss against the Oakland Raiders 2:28

Jay Cutler speaks to media after Miami Dolphins loss against the Oakland Raiders

Julius Thomas speaks to media after Miami Dolphins loss against Oakland Raiders 0:47

Julius Thomas speaks to media after Miami Dolphins loss against Oakland Raiders

  • Son of former Cali cartel boss accuses Netflix of tarnishing his reputation

    William Rodríguez Abadía, son of Miguel Rodríguez Orejuela, the former boss of the powerful Cali cartel in Colombia, asserts that Netflix series 'Narcos' doesn't have all the facts correct. He spoke with el Nuevo Herald's reporter Catalina Ruiz.