More Videos

Son of former Cali cartel boss accuses Netflix of tarnishing his reputation 1:19

Son of former Cali cartel boss accuses Netflix of tarnishing his reputation

Richt on his halftime speech and being 10-0 for the first time as Head Coach 2:25

Richt on his halftime speech and being 10-0 for the first time as Head Coach

A farmer and a church reap rewards from an organic field of dreams 2:06

A farmer and a church reap rewards from an organic field of dreams

36 questions that lead to love (again) 5:01

36 questions that lead to love (again)

Should Lolita be freed? What's next for her and other large marine mammals in captivity. 5:19

Should Lolita be freed? What's next for her and other large marine mammals in captivity.

Panthers Ron Rivera happy with running backs play 0:32

Panthers Ron Rivera happy with running backs play

In 90 Seconds: Thanksgiving 2017, by the numbers 1:35

In 90 Seconds: Thanksgiving 2017, by the numbers

U.S. Navy to Deploy Undersea Rescue Capabilities to Argentina 1:11

U.S. Navy to Deploy Undersea Rescue Capabilities to Argentina

Joe Carollo crashes press conference 1:21

Joe Carollo crashes press conference

DealBook Conference: AT&T, Uber and President Cuban? 1:46

DealBook Conference: AT&T, Uber and President Cuban?

  • Coca tea factory in Colombia

    Since 1999, Colombia's Nasa tribe have been making coca-based products under a special license issued only to indigenous groups. Now lawmakers are mulling opening up the specialty industry to everyone as a way to regulate coca and fight the cocaine trade. In this clip, women at the Coca Nasa factory package the leaf into tea bags.

Since 1999, Colombia's Nasa tribe have been making coca-based products under a special license issued only to indigenous groups. Now lawmakers are mulling opening up the specialty industry to everyone as a way to regulate coca and fight the cocaine trade. In this clip, women at the Coca Nasa factory package the leaf into tea bags. Jim Wyss jwyss@miamiherald.com
Since 1999, Colombia's Nasa tribe have been making coca-based products under a special license issued only to indigenous groups. Now lawmakers are mulling opening up the specialty industry to everyone as a way to regulate coca and fight the cocaine trade. In this clip, women at the Coca Nasa factory package the leaf into tea bags. Jim Wyss jwyss@miamiherald.com

Putting coca back in the cola, Colombia mulls coca-based products

September 09, 2016 12:10 PM

UPDATED September 09, 2016 05:54 PM

More Videos

Son of former Cali cartel boss accuses Netflix of tarnishing his reputation 1:19

Son of former Cali cartel boss accuses Netflix of tarnishing his reputation

Richt on his halftime speech and being 10-0 for the first time as Head Coach 2:25

Richt on his halftime speech and being 10-0 for the first time as Head Coach

A farmer and a church reap rewards from an organic field of dreams 2:06

A farmer and a church reap rewards from an organic field of dreams

36 questions that lead to love (again) 5:01

36 questions that lead to love (again)

Should Lolita be freed? What's next for her and other large marine mammals in captivity. 5:19

Should Lolita be freed? What's next for her and other large marine mammals in captivity.

Panthers Ron Rivera happy with running backs play 0:32

Panthers Ron Rivera happy with running backs play

In 90 Seconds: Thanksgiving 2017, by the numbers 1:35

In 90 Seconds: Thanksgiving 2017, by the numbers

U.S. Navy to Deploy Undersea Rescue Capabilities to Argentina 1:11

U.S. Navy to Deploy Undersea Rescue Capabilities to Argentina

Joe Carollo crashes press conference 1:21

Joe Carollo crashes press conference

DealBook Conference: AT&T, Uber and President Cuban? 1:46

DealBook Conference: AT&T, Uber and President Cuban?

  • Son of former Cali cartel boss accuses Netflix of tarnishing his reputation

    William Rodríguez Abadía, son of Miguel Rodríguez Orejuela, the former boss of the powerful Cali cartel in Colombia, asserts that Netflix series 'Narcos' doesn't have all the facts correct. He spoke with el Nuevo Herald's reporter Catalina Ruiz.