A new autism study from University of Warwick researchers published in the journal Molecular Autism found autism-linked protein damage in blood plasma that could make for a 90 percent accurate autism diagnostic test — which they found by comparing Italian children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder to children without.
A new autism study from University of Warwick researchers published in the journal Molecular Autism found autism-linked protein damage in blood plasma that could make for a 90 percent accurate autism diagnostic test — which they found by comparing Italian children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder to children without. Denis Poroy AP
A new autism study from University of Warwick researchers published in the journal Molecular Autism found autism-linked protein damage in blood plasma that could make for a 90 percent accurate autism diagnostic test — which they found by comparing Italian children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder to children without. Denis Poroy AP

Autism is hard to diagnose in young children. This blood test could change that, researchers say

February 19, 2018 05:14 PM