Kevin Portillo, 17, works out with a homemade barbell in a space that will eventually be a gym. The space was formerly a casa loca or madhouse, one of many criminal lairs in Honduras. In this part of San Pedro Sula,  police reform and security are key to improving life in a violent nation.
Kevin Portillo, 17, works out with a homemade barbell in a space that will eventually be a gym. The space was formerly a casa loca or madhouse, one of many criminal lairs in Honduras. In this part of San Pedro Sula, police reform and security are key to improving life in a violent nation. PATRICK FARRELL pfarrell@miamiherald.com
Kevin Portillo, 17, works out with a homemade barbell in a space that will eventually be a gym. The space was formerly a casa loca or madhouse, one of many criminal lairs in Honduras. In this part of San Pedro Sula, police reform and security are key to improving life in a violent nation. PATRICK FARRELL pfarrell@miamiherald.com

Reform and larger police presence making Hondurans feel safer

October 02, 2015 03:50 PM

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