A new study of Florida beaches has found high amounts of microplastics, which could increase sand temperature and produce more female hatchlings. This Kemps ridley sea turtle makes its way to the Gulf of Mexico from the Texas coast.
A new study of Florida beaches has found high amounts of microplastics, which could increase sand temperature and produce more female hatchlings. This Kemps ridley sea turtle makes its way to the Gulf of Mexico from the Texas coast. Rachel Denny Clow Corpus Christi Caller-Times
A new study of Florida beaches has found high amounts of microplastics, which could increase sand temperature and produce more female hatchlings. This Kemps ridley sea turtle makes its way to the Gulf of Mexico from the Texas coast. Rachel Denny Clow Corpus Christi Caller-Times

Florida sea turtles face a new threat from microplastics: hotter sand

May 02, 2018 06:04 PM