(FILES) Photo dated 15 October 2005 shows a Taiwanese coastguard clad in protective clothing examining a bird smuggled into the island from China in the central Taichung harbour. Eight pet birds smuggled into Taiwan from China tested positive for the deadly H5N1 bird flu virus but an outbreak was unlikely as all the birds they were seized with had been destroyed, health officials said 20 October 2005. AFP PHOTO/Ting Chih-kuan  TAIWAN OUT
(FILES) Photo dated 15 October 2005 shows a Taiwanese coastguard clad in protective clothing examining a bird smuggled into the island from China in the central Taichung harbour. Eight pet birds smuggled into Taiwan from China tested positive for the deadly H5N1 bird flu virus but an outbreak was unlikely as all the birds they were seized with had been destroyed, health officials said 20 October 2005. AFP PHOTO/Ting Chih-kuan TAIWAN OUT
(FILES) Photo dated 15 October 2005 shows a Taiwanese coastguard clad in protective clothing examining a bird smuggled into the island from China in the central Taichung harbour. Eight pet birds smuggled into Taiwan from China tested positive for the deadly H5N1 bird flu virus but an outbreak was unlikely as all the birds they were seized with had been destroyed, health officials said 20 October 2005. AFP PHOTO/Ting Chih-kuan TAIWAN OUT

South Florida bird smuggling ring headed to court

April 13, 2018 02:57 PM