Since Hurricane Irma, residents have helped tend to endangered Key deer, shown here in October 2016 after an outbreak of Old World screwworm. Federal wildlife officials, however, warn that feeding the deer can harm them.
Since Hurricane Irma, residents have helped tend to endangered Key deer, shown here in October 2016 after an outbreak of Old World screwworm. Federal wildlife officials, however, warn that feeding the deer can harm them. Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com
Since Hurricane Irma, residents have helped tend to endangered Key deer, shown here in October 2016 after an outbreak of Old World screwworm. Federal wildlife officials, however, warn that feeding the deer can harm them. Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com

Please stop feeding the Key deer. Wildlife managers say it hurts, not helps

October 11, 2017 7:05 AM

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