In this January photo, an Aedes aegypti mosquito is photographed through a microscope at the Fiocruz institute in Brazil. Volunteer Google engineers in San Francisco and New York are working with UNICEF counterparts to create a system that combines several types of data to help predict where the mosquito, which spreads the Zika virus, might next be particularly active.
In this January photo, an Aedes aegypti mosquito is photographed through a microscope at the Fiocruz institute in Brazil. Volunteer Google engineers in San Francisco and New York are working with UNICEF counterparts to create a system that combines several types of data to help predict where the mosquito, which spreads the Zika virus, might next be particularly active. Felipe Dana AP
In this January photo, an Aedes aegypti mosquito is photographed through a microscope at the Fiocruz institute in Brazil. Volunteer Google engineers in San Francisco and New York are working with UNICEF counterparts to create a system that combines several types of data to help predict where the mosquito, which spreads the Zika virus, might next be particularly active. Felipe Dana AP

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