In this September 2015 photo, Dr. Dileep R. Yavagal, chief of interventional neurology for the University of Miami Health System, demonstrates how by using a stent device, he was able to grab a clot inside of the blocked brain artery in a stroke victim, Isabel Vinueza (right). A study published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine found that surgical removal of a clot plus standard care with clot-busting medication produced better outcomes for stroke patients with injured but viable brain tissue.
In this September 2015 photo, Dr. Dileep R. Yavagal, chief of interventional neurology for the University of Miami Health System, demonstrates how by using a stent device, he was able to grab a clot inside of the blocked brain artery in a stroke victim, Isabel Vinueza (right). A study published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine found that surgical removal of a clot plus standard care with clot-busting medication produced better outcomes for stroke patients with injured but viable brain tissue. Emily Michot Miami Herald Staff/File
In this September 2015 photo, Dr. Dileep R. Yavagal, chief of interventional neurology for the University of Miami Health System, demonstrates how by using a stent device, he was able to grab a clot inside of the blocked brain artery in a stroke victim, Isabel Vinueza (right). A study published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine found that surgical removal of a clot plus standard care with clot-busting medication produced better outcomes for stroke patients with injured but viable brain tissue. Emily Michot Miami Herald Staff/File

Stroke patients may have more time — up to 24 hours — to get treatment, study finds

November 17, 2017 12:51 PM

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