Carmen Puliafito, former dean of the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine, was among a team of scientists awarded the António Champalimaud Vision Award for the development and invention of technology that helps clinicians diagnose and treat blinding diseases such as macular degeneration. Puliafito, former chairman of the University of Miami’s Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, led a secret life in which he kept company with a circle of criminals and drug users, according to a report in the Los Angeles Times.
Carmen Puliafito, former dean of the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine, was among a team of scientists awarded the António Champalimaud Vision Award for the development and invention of technology that helps clinicians diagnose and treat blinding diseases such as macular degeneration. Puliafito, former chairman of the University of Miami’s Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, led a secret life in which he kept company with a circle of criminals and drug users, according to a report in the Los Angeles Times. Ryan Ball University of Southern California
Carmen Puliafito, former dean of the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine, was among a team of scientists awarded the António Champalimaud Vision Award for the development and invention of technology that helps clinicians diagnose and treat blinding diseases such as macular degeneration. Puliafito, former chairman of the University of Miami’s Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, led a secret life in which he kept company with a circle of criminals and drug users, according to a report in the Los Angeles Times. Ryan Ball University of Southern California

Health Care

July 17, 2017 10:45 AM

Meth parties, addicts, and hookers: a former Miami medical leader’s secret life unmasked

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