More Videos

New high blood pressure guidelines mean 30 million more Americans have hypertension 2:10

New high blood pressure guidelines mean 30 million more Americans have hypertension

Protesters disrupt GOP health care hearing 0:21

Protesters disrupt GOP health care hearing

Protesters say Obamacare repeal will put some 'out on the streets' 1:35

Protesters say Obamacare repeal will put some 'out on the streets'

With not enough support, Graham-Cassidy health care bill vote scrapped 1:58

With not enough support, Graham-Cassidy health care bill vote scrapped

5 steps to staying covered under Obamacare 0:55

5 steps to staying covered under Obamacare

Mom of ‘Baby Lollipops’ convicted for third time of torture and murder of son 5:26

Mom of ‘Baby Lollipops’ convicted for third time of torture and murder of son

City, court force Miami Shores residents to remove vegetable garden from front yard 1:38

City, court force Miami Shores residents to remove vegetable garden from front yard

85-year-old Holocaust survivor sky dives with grandson 1:41

85-year-old Holocaust survivor sky dives with grandson

​Colombia's B-movie king wants to go global 1:54

​Colombia's B-movie king wants to go global

'I think this is one of our most complete games thus far,' Landry says 1:08

'I think this is one of our most complete games thus far,' Landry says

  • Cancer survivor talks about life before Obamacare

    Before the Affordable Care Act stopped insurers from denying coverage for a pre-existing health condition, many consumers were turned down, charged higher prices or had conditions excluded from their plans. Nancy Blitz fears that dismantling Obamacare could mean a return to those practices.

Before the Affordable Care Act stopped insurers from denying coverage for a pre-existing health condition, many consumers were turned down, charged higher prices or had conditions excluded from their plans. Nancy Blitz fears that dismantling Obamacare could mean a return to those practices. Video by Daniel Chang / Edited by Pierre Taylor dchang@miamiherald.com
Before the Affordable Care Act stopped insurers from denying coverage for a pre-existing health condition, many consumers were turned down, charged higher prices or had conditions excluded from their plans. Nancy Blitz fears that dismantling Obamacare could mean a return to those practices. Video by Daniel Chang / Edited by Pierre Taylor dchang@miamiherald.com

Before Obamacare, a cancer survivor struggled for insurance. Will it happen again?

February 16, 2017 07:00 AM

UPDATED March 02, 2017 10:24 AM

More Videos

New high blood pressure guidelines mean 30 million more Americans have hypertension 2:10

New high blood pressure guidelines mean 30 million more Americans have hypertension

Protesters disrupt GOP health care hearing 0:21

Protesters disrupt GOP health care hearing

Protesters say Obamacare repeal will put some 'out on the streets' 1:35

Protesters say Obamacare repeal will put some 'out on the streets'

With not enough support, Graham-Cassidy health care bill vote scrapped 1:58

With not enough support, Graham-Cassidy health care bill vote scrapped

5 steps to staying covered under Obamacare 0:55

5 steps to staying covered under Obamacare

Mom of ‘Baby Lollipops’ convicted for third time of torture and murder of son 5:26

Mom of ‘Baby Lollipops’ convicted for third time of torture and murder of son

City, court force Miami Shores residents to remove vegetable garden from front yard 1:38

City, court force Miami Shores residents to remove vegetable garden from front yard

85-year-old Holocaust survivor sky dives with grandson 1:41

85-year-old Holocaust survivor sky dives with grandson

​Colombia's B-movie king wants to go global 1:54

​Colombia's B-movie king wants to go global

'I think this is one of our most complete games thus far,' Landry says 1:08

'I think this is one of our most complete games thus far,' Landry says

  • New high blood pressure guidelines mean 30 million more Americans have hypertension

    Under the new guidelines, the number of adults with high blood pressure will rise to 103 million from 72 million. Hypertension is the leading cause of heart disease and heart-related deaths in the U.S. and worldwide.