The absence of universal health care, growing obesity rates, rising income inequality, high homicide rates, and high maternal and child mortality rates explain, in part, why the U.S. is not winning the longevity stakes.
The absence of universal health care, growing obesity rates, rising income inequality, high homicide rates, and high maternal and child mortality rates explain, in part, why the U.S. is not winning the longevity stakes. Miami Herald File
The absence of universal health care, growing obesity rates, rising income inequality, high homicide rates, and high maternal and child mortality rates explain, in part, why the U.S. is not winning the longevity stakes. Miami Herald File

The good news: We’ll live longer. The bad news: We’ll die before others

February 27, 2017 08:56 AM

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