Carol Wilson, 81, who had been unable to play golf or walk any distance after a heart attack, leaps with joy while putting at the Miami Shores Country Club on Feb. 9. Her recovery began after she took part in the stem cell studies Dr. Joshua Hare was leading with heart patients at the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine.
Carol Wilson, 81, who had been unable to play golf or walk any distance after a heart attack, leaps with joy while putting at the Miami Shores Country Club on Feb. 9. Her recovery began after she took part in the stem cell studies Dr. Joshua Hare was leading with heart patients at the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine. CARL JUSTE cjuste@miamiherald.com
Carol Wilson, 81, who had been unable to play golf or walk any distance after a heart attack, leaps with joy while putting at the Miami Shores Country Club on Feb. 9. Her recovery began after she took part in the stem cell studies Dr. Joshua Hare was leading with heart patients at the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine. CARL JUSTE cjuste@miamiherald.com

Life after a heart attack: She’s golfing. He’s running. How they did it.

February 23, 2017 07:00 AM

UPDATED February 23, 2017 03:35 PM

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