Jim Elliott, left, president of Diveheart, dives with Joseph Deslauriers 36, a wounded Air Force retired vet, off the Fort Lauderdale coast. They’re checking on coral with Nova Southeastern University College of Natural Sciences and Oceanography, and DiveBar, Wednesday June 24, 2015. Joseph lost one arm and both legs in a land mine explosion.
Jim Elliott, left, president of Diveheart, dives with Joseph Deslauriers 36, a wounded Air Force retired vet, off the Fort Lauderdale coast. They’re checking on coral with Nova Southeastern University College of Natural Sciences and Oceanography, and DiveBar, Wednesday June 24, 2015. Joseph lost one arm and both legs in a land mine explosion. Jenny Staletovich MIAMI HERALD File Photo
Jim Elliott, left, president of Diveheart, dives with Joseph Deslauriers 36, a wounded Air Force retired vet, off the Fort Lauderdale coast. They’re checking on coral with Nova Southeastern University College of Natural Sciences and Oceanography, and DiveBar, Wednesday June 24, 2015. Joseph lost one arm and both legs in a land mine explosion. Jenny Staletovich MIAMI HERALD File Photo

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