Tennis

Isner-Querrey match gets special attention at Miami Open

John Isner, of the United States, reacts after defeating Milos Raonic, of Canada, 6-7 (3), 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5) during the Miami Open early Wednesday, April 1, 2015, in Key Biscayne, Fla.
John Isner, of the United States, reacts after defeating Milos Raonic, of Canada, 6-7 (3), 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5) during the Miami Open early Wednesday, April 1, 2015, in Key Biscayne, Fla. AP

We all know about photo bombing, but how about interview crashing?

That’s exactly what happened to Americans John Isner and Sam Querrey at the Miami Open on Wednesday afternoon.

The unseeded Isner-Querrey duo — known around the tour as “Quisner” — were talking to the Miami Herald after posting a 6-3, 6-4 quarterfinal upset over fourth-seeded Jean-Julian Rojer of the Netherlands and Horia Tecau of Romania.

Along came none other than world No.1 Novak Djokovic, and presumably because it was April Fool’s Day they decided to have some fun.

“Novak was out watching our doubles,” said Querrey, joking around.

“Yes, it was great doubles, and I’m going to do scouting [of] their next match, too,” said Djokovic, leaning into the tape recorder to make sure he was being heard.

“So Novak, did you get a few tips out there watching these guys?” came the follow-up question.

“Absolutely,” Djokovic said, laughing. “John taught me how to hit the wide serve for the break point.”

That’s when the humor stopped and a little reality set in. Djokovic confirmed Isner could offer him some quality serving secrets.

“It will do me very good,” Djokovic said. “I actually need that shot.”

Isner and Querrey can be considered a regular doubles team for as much as they play during the season. They have been in five finals and won two titles. The selection process as to where they play about five doubles events a year is pretty simple.

“A lot of times doubles can be a hindrance to singles because it jams matches up,” Isner said. “But at Indian Wells and Miami, where they’re 10 days or so tournaments, it is like practice. And regular practice can get a little bit monotonous.”

Their reward for reaching the semifinals is an all-American duel against top seeds and defending champions Bob and Mike Bryan. The Bryans have won all nine meetings.

The Bryans, who have a record 104 career titles, struggled to win their quarterfinal 6-4, 4-6 (10-6) over Kevin Anderson of South Africa and Jeremy Chardy of France. In fact, the Bryans trailed 6-4 in the match tiebreak before winning the final six points.

The Bryans are more entrenched in the local South Florida community, with Bob living here since his marriage to Michelle, a Miami attorney, in 2010. The couple now have two children and own a home in Hallandale Beach.

“I feel like I got my feet under me here in Florida,” Bob said. “I’m starting to turn into an East Coast guy. I’m even a Dolphins fan now, although I still favor the Lakers over the Heat.”

Mike continues to maintain the home he shared with Bob in Wesley Chapel on the west coast of Florida. But he and his wife, Lucille, were looking around South Florida for property in December. Wellington, a well-known equestrian community, was one place that caught their attention.

“South Florida is probably the next stop,” Mike said. “The wife loves horses. We haven’t pulled the trigger yet, but I think we will.”

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