Barry Jackson

Eddie Jones weighs in on similarities between himself and Heat’s Josh Richardson

The 2000 news conference when Eddie Jones, right, was acquired by Heat president Pat Riley, left, in a trade from Charlotte. Jones sees similarities between himself and Heat swingman Josh Richardson.
The 2000 news conference when Eddie Jones, right, was acquired by Heat president Pat Riley, left, in a trade from Charlotte. Jones sees similarities between himself and Heat swingman Josh Richardson. Miami Herald Staff

Some Heat notes on a Wednesday:

▪ When the Heat drafted Josh Richardson in 2015, both Dwyane Wade and Udonis Haslem mentioned similarities between Richardson and former Heat guard Eddie Jones.

Jones this week said he also sees those similarities.

“I like the kid,” Jones said at Jason Taylor’s annual charity golf tournament.

“I would like to see him more aggressive [offensively]. Before Dwyane got back, he was super aggressive. I wish he would keep that aggressiveness and not defer as much.”

Like Jones, Richardson is an excellent defender; this season, he is holding players he guards to 40.6 percent shooting, fourth-best among all forwards who have defended at least 300 shots.

“I love the way he defends,” Jones said. “He doesn’t want to be embarrassed [by the player he’s guarding]. I like watching him play. If you are a two-way player, it can take a toll on your offense. [But] I like the way he shoots the three.”

Haslem said when he and Wade initially compared Richardson to Jones, “it was physical at first. At that time, Josh was back and forth between the D-League and here. It was their physical attributes and faces.”

But Haslem also sees similarities in their skill sets, especially as rangy, skilled defenders and capable three-point shooters.

And Jones said Richardson reminds him of himself in some ways.

“He’s a talent,” Jones said. “His upside is pretty good.”

Jones, who spent parts of six seasons with the Heat (2000-2005 and 2007), is 46 now, living in Weston and working in real estate.

He has two daughters and a son, but don’t look for his son in the NBA; he decided he didn’t want to play basketball once he got to high school.

Richardson spoke about having Dwyane Wade, one of his mentors, back as a teammate for the stretch run of the season.

Richardson is averaging 13.3 points this season. Jones averaged 14.8 in his career, with two of his All-Star appearances coming with the Lakers and one with Charlotte.

▪ Heat executive Alonzo Mourning has been pushing Bam Adebayo.

“He says I have a bright future,” Adebayo said. “He said he wishes he was more athletic than me when he was younger.”

Adebayo — who also gets nice texts from Kentucky coach John Calipari after big games — is not a fan of the Dwight Howard comparisons but is eager to meet Kevin Garnett and is trying to incorporate Garnett’s “simple but so effective” post game into his repertoire.

Adebayo’s minutes have decreased this week amid the return of Rodney McGruder, Kelly Olynyk and Tyler Johnson from injuries.

▪ According to Basketball Reference, Hassan Whiteside has a chance to become the first player in NBA history to average 12 rebounds per game without playing at least 26 minutes per game. Whiteside is averaging 11.9 rebounds and 25.8 minutes.

▪ Wade has three games of 20 or more points in his past five games. That’s the same number of 20-plus games he had over his first 51 games this season.

Here’s some eye-opening stuff on Wade’s impact on the franchise in terms of TV ratings and ticket sales.

The Heat listed Ellington (bruised thigh) as probable for Thursday's game against Philadelphia, meaning coach Erik Spoelstra is about to have a choice of 12 players who have been in NBA rotations in the past year, plus Udonis Haslem and Jordan Mickey.

Related stories from Miami Herald

  Comments